Author Topic: Best 27" 4K 3840x2160 & 5K 5120x2880 AHVA/IPS/PLS Monitors  (Read 19249 times)

NCX

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Best 27" 4K 3840x2160 & 5K 5120x2880 AHVA/IPS/PLS Monitors
« on: July 31, 2017, 11:40:21 pm »
Last Update=August 24th 2019

All New Reviews Added Here

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Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 4-5K AHVA/IPS/PLS

Always purchase from retailers with hassle free return and exchange policies.  Read retailers return and exchange policies before buying.[/center]

My recommendations are based off of testing more than 60 monitors and reading in-depth reviews from over fifteen reviewers across the realm.

Best Monitor Review Sites: Monitor Review Resource Center

Many monitors not found in this thread likely perform well, but it makes more sense to buy well reviewed monitors, and I like having sources to refer to, even though I do not always agree with them.

If a monitor is not mentioned it is because it has not been reviewed properly, been reviewed at all or is mediocre.  All monitors suffer from regular quality control issues: back-light bleeding and pixel issues (dead and stuck pixels).

Recommendations are PWM or Flicker Free:

I do not recommend monitors which use low LED PWM Dimming frequencies since they ruin motion clarity and cause some people to suffer from health issues like head aches and eyestrain.  LED PWM Dimming Side Effects.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2019, 04:25:35 pm by NCX »

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NCX

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Best Monitors
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2017, 11:45:08 pm »
Best Monitors

*=Perceived black depth increasing matte black or grey (superior) bezel versus fake frame-less monitors perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel.
^=384 zone local dimming which vastly increases the contrast ratio.
+=Variable back-light which vastly increases the contrast ratio.
-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel
# Tested by NCX

1.) Asus PG27UQ *^ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
1.) Acer X27 *^# (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
2.) Acer Predator XB273K *+ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 400cdm/2 HDR)
3. Acer Nitro XV273K * (120-144hz semi-wide gamut/HDR capable with AMD Free-Sync)
4.) Viewsonic VP2768-4K - (very accurate IPS panel with hardware calibration)
4.) Philips 272P7VPTKEB - (very accurate IPS)
5.) Asus PB27UQ * (accurate with 40-60hz Free-Sync)
7.) LG 27UL550 *# (accurate with 40-60hz Free-Sync)
8.) Monoprice RTD2795 -# (40-60hz Free-Sync & low glow AHVA panel)
8.) Viewsonic XG2700-4K * (40-60hz Free-Sync & very accurate IPS panel)
8.) BenQ PD2700U - (very accurate matte IPS with height adjustable stand)
9.) Philips 276E8VJSB - (very accurate matte IPS without VESA mounts)
10.) Dell P2715Q * (very accurate IPS panel & real bezel)
11.) LG 27UL650  - (40-60hz Free-Sync; 2019 model with slightly faster pixel response times than the UD and UK monitors)
11.) LG 27UD69 - (40-60hz Free-Sync)
11.) LG 27UD68 - (40-60hz Free-Sync)
11. LG 27UK650 - (40-60hz Free-Sync)
12.) LG 27UK600 - (40-60hz Free-Sync)

The Acer X27 and Asus PG27UQ are matte 4K AHVA panels with 98hz (8 Bit +FRC / 10 bit HDR 4:4:4), Nvidia G-Sync, height adjustable stand, 4x USB 3.0, local dimming and true HDR color.  Full 4K and 10 bit color (YcBcr 4:4:4) is only supported up to 98hz.  Higher refresh rates requires one to drop the signal from 10 bit to 8 bit (120hz) and from  YcBcr 4:4:4 to YcBcr 4:2:2 (144hz), which results in a loss of clarity, color and text sharpness.  The 384 zone local dimming, gamma shift free and low glow AHVA panel these monitors use allow them to provide vastly superior image quality (especially dark content) compared to all other LCD panels.  Tthe Acer XB273K which is a lower end version with slightly lower HDR color space coverage, lower maximum brightness (400cdm/2 vs 1000cdm/2), and inferior variable back-lighting since the XB273K is edge lit while the X27 and PG27UQ have 384 dimming zones.  According to TechSpot the Acer has slightly better preset color accuracy and lower input lag than the Asus (11.4ms versus 15.6ms), but has slightly slower pixel response times.  Other reviews prove that the Asus is more accurate.

The Acer XB273K has very accurate accurate (SDR/sRGB & HDR color modes; color controls are locked when HDR is enabled) 144hz (achievable only when connected with 2x Displayport cables) 3840x2160 or 4K matte wide gamut AUO HAVA panel which can cover 87.65% of the DCI-P3 color space, provide 460cdmn/2 peak brightness, and can fully cover the sRGB color space to prevent over-saturation when the sRGB mode is selected.  It has a fully adjustable stand, a monitor hood, 1x Displayport, 1x HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0, 3.5mm Audio Out and Nvidia G-Sync.

My rankings prioritize preset color accuracy, low glow and perceived black depth increasing matte grey bezels.  Ranking the non-top 3 monitors is difficult since I have not tested most of them myself and can not determine how much glow they suffer from.  The Philips 276E8VJSB is the best cheap option since it is very accurate, as accurate as some of the 500$+ options and is the cheapest in most countries.  The 27UL550 I tested suffers from minimal glow, tends to be quite competitively priced and supports Free-Sync, but it's not as accurate as the Asus PB27UQ, BenQ PD2700U, Philips 272P7VPTKEB, Philips 276E8VJSB, Viewsonic VP2768-4K, and Viewsonic XG2700-4K.  The Viewsonic XG2700-4K has a perceived black depth increasing matte grey bezel, supports Free-Sync and has nearly perfect preset color accuracy, but uses an older LG AH-IPS panel with more glow than the Acer X27, XB273K, XV273K, Asus PG27UQ 27UL550 and Monoprice RTD2795; I'm not sure if it glows less than the other models I did not mention.

LG UD, UK and UL Series monitors Belgium Hardware Colorimeter and Oscilloscope Measurement Comparison Chart.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2019, 04:40:58 pm by NCX »

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Best AMD Free-Sync Monitors
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2017, 11:46:22 pm »
Best AMD Free-Sync Monitors

*=Perceived black depth increasing matte black or grey (superior) bezel versus fake frame-less monitors perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel.
^=384 zone local dimming which vastly increases the contrast ratio.
+=Variable back-light which vastly increases the contrast ratio.
-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel
# Tested by NCX

1.) Acer Nitro XV273K * (120-144hz semi-wide gamut/HDR capable with AMD Free-Sync)
2.) Asus PB27UQ *
3.) LG 27UL550 *#
4.) Monoprice RTD2795 -#
4.) Viewsonic XG2700-4K *
5.) LG 27UL650 - (2019 model with slightly faster pixel response times than the UD and UK monitors)
5.) LG 27UK650 -
5.) LG 27UD68 or 69 -

The Acer XV273K has an accurate 144hz (achievable only when connected with 2x Displayport cables) 3840x2160 or 4K matte wide gamut AUO HAVA panel which can cover 97% of the DCI-P3 color space, and can fully cover the sRGB color space to prevent over-saturation when the sRGB mode is available.  It has a fully adjustable stand, a monitor hood, 2x Displayport, 2x HDMI 2.0,4x USB 3.0 and a 3.5mm Audio Out.

Reading the monitors included manual and reviews is necessary in order to properly understand how to use a wide gamut monitor, fully make use of all its feature, and prevent wide gamut color over-saturation.

For multi-media (gaming, photo viewing, movies and TV) the Asus PB27UQ is the best affordable option since it has a perceived black depth increasing dark matte grey bezel, excellent all around performance and supports Adaptive/AMD Free-Sync.  The LG 27UL550 is the second best option with Free-Sync since it is more accurate than the Monoprice, suffers from less glow than the XG2700-4K, and has a perceived black depth increasing dark matte grey bezel while the LG UD and UK monitors use fake bezel or frame-less casings with perceived black depth decreasing inner black bezels.  The Monoprice RTD2795 is the third best affordable option since it uses a low glow AHVA panel, and because its preset color accuracy can be vastly improved and become competitive by changing the Temperature setting in the Color Menu to Warm.

The Viewsonic XG2700-4K has nearly perfect preset accuracy and a bright matte grey bezel which vastly increases the perceived black depth, but it uses an older IPS panel with more glow than Asus PB27UQ, LG 27UL550 and Monoprice RTD2795, and its Response Time and Input Lag settings are preset to the lowest settings or turned off and need to be changed to offer competitive pixel response times and input lag.  Set the Response Time Setting to Advanced in the Manual Image Adjust menu, then in the Manual Image Adjust Menu go to the Advanced Image Adjust sub-menu and set the Low Input Lag setting to the highest setting.  Menu Photo Tour from the Tom's Hardware Review.

LG UD, UK and UL Series monitors Belgium Hardware Colorimeter and Oscilloscope Measurement Comparison Chart.

The LG 27UD68 (2016) and 27UD69 (2017) are pretty much the same as the 27UK650 which is more accurate than the 27UK850-W (2018) which has a height adjustable stand, USB 3.0 (x2) faux HDR* support and supports hardware calibration (LG True Color Pro which requires a colorimeter) while the 68, 69, and 650 monitors do not support hardware calibration.  The 27UK850-W reviewed by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=) came with lower preset gamma than the 68 & 69, but it can be raised by changing the Gamma Mode from 2 to 4.  The 27UK850-W's hardware calibration feature caused increased banding and tinting of gradients which makes it a feature not worth buying a colorimeter for since more accurate, and cheaper competitors are available.

*The LG monitors lack a true 10 bit wide gamut panel required for proper HDR support, as well as only offers 450cdm/2 brightness of the 1,000cdm/2 minimum of the HDR standard.  HDR is best left off.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2019, 09:22:00 pm by NCX »

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Best Nvidia G-Sync Monitors
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2017, 11:46:55 pm »
Best Nvidia G-Sync Monitors

Blur Busters G-Sync Input Lag Testing & Optimal Lag Reducing Game Settings

*=Perceived black depth increasing matte black or grey (superior) bezel versus fake frame-less monitors perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel.
^=384 zone local dimming which increases the contrast ratio.
+=Variable back-light which increases the contrast ratio.
-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel
# Tested by NCX

1.) Asus PG27UQ *^ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
1.) Acer X27 *^# (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
2.) Acer Predator XB273K *+ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 400cdm/2 HDR)
3.) AOC AG271UG * (30-60hz G-Sync)
4.) Asus PG27AQ - (30-60hz G-Sync)
5.) Acer XB271HK - (30-60hz G-Sync)

The Acer X27 and Asus PG27UQ are matte 4K AHVA panels with 98hz (8 Bit +FRC / 10 bit HDR 4:4:4), Nvidia G-Sync, height adjustable stand, 4x USB 3.0, local dimming and true HDR color.  Full 4K and 10 bit color (YcBcr 4:4:4) is only supported up to 98hz.  Higher refresh rates requires one to drop the signal from 10 bit to 8 bit (120hz) and from  YcBcr 4:4:4 to YcBcr 4:2:2 (144hz), which results in a loss of clarity, color and text sharpness.  The 384 zone local dimming, gamma shift free and low glow AHVA panel these monitors use allow them to provide vastly superior image quality (especially dark content) compared to all other LCD panels.  According to TechSpot the Acer has slightly better preset color accuracy and lower input lag than the Asus (11.4ms versus 15.6ms), but has slightly slower pixel response times.  Other reviews prove that the Asus is more accurate.

The Acer XB273K is a lower end version of the X27 and PG27UQ with slightly lower HDR color space coverage, lower maximum brightness (460cdm/2 vs 1000cdm/2), and inferior variable back-ligh dimming since the XB273K only has three dimming zones while the X27 and PG27UQ have 384 dimming zones. 

The Acer XB273K has very accurate Standard mode preset  (SDR/sRGB & HDR color modes; color controls are locked when HDR is enabled), 144hz (compressed 4:2:2 YCbCr422 color signal called instead of 8 bit 4:4:4 YCbCr444 @120hz and 10 bit 4:4:4 YCbCr444 @98hz), 3840x2160 or 4K matte wide gamut AUO HAVA panel which can cover 87.65% of the DCI-P3 color space, provide 460cdmn/2 peak brightness, and can fully cover the sRGB color space to prevent over-saturation when the sRGB mode is selected.  It has a fully adjustable stand, a monitor hood, 1x Displayport, 1x HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0, 3.5mm Audio Out and Nvidia G-Sync.

Reading the monitors included manual and/or reviews of the Acer X27, XV273K and Asus PG27UQ is necessary in order to properly understand how to use a wide gamut monitor, and fully make use of all their features such as the 384 zone local dimming or dynamic contrast, and prevent wide gamut color over-saturation.

There are three 60hz 27" 4K monitors with Nvidia G-Sync, they are the Acer XB271HK (worst), AOC AG271UG and the Asus PG27AQ. All have fully adjustable stands, fast pixel response times with minimal overshoot ghosting and negligible input lag, but the AOC and Asus have superior preset color accuracy since the Acer XB271HK suffers from suffers from bleaching and an inaccurate preset gamma curve caused by the contrast being set too high (reducing contrast from 50 to 42 fixes this according to Toms Hardware).

The AOC is slightly less accurate than the Asus, but the AOC has gamma settings to fix the lowish preset gamma while the Asus does not which leaves one at the mercy of the factory calibration which is why both are tied for third place.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2019, 02:28:37 am by NCX »

NCX

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Wide Gamut Monitors
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2017, 11:47:48 pm »
Nvidia Support for Adaptive or AMD Free-Sync

Nvidia 10 series graphics cards support Adaptive or AMD Free-Sync, though only a limited number of monitors are confirmed to support it, and some monitors have issues with Nvidia cards.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2019, 07:42:37 pm by NCX »

NCX

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Correct Display Height=Reduced AHVA/IPS/PLS Glow
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2017, 11:48:56 pm »
Correct Display Height=Reduced AHVA/IPS/PLS Glow

Read The Article and/or watch The Extended YouTube Version
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBAQ4Toxt9U
« Last Edit: April 01, 2019, 08:41:01 pm by NCX »

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Improve Perceived Contrast/Black Depth & Reduce Glare With Bias Lighting

Read the Steemit Article and/or watch it on YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1Dnp7RTZWs
« Last Edit: October 02, 2018, 10:42:59 pm by NCX »

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Acer
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2017, 11:49:41 pm »
Acer

Acer S277HK

-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel

Review by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=)
Review By Les Numeriqes
Review by Extra Hardware CZ
Review By PRAD


Acer XB271HK

-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel

30-60hz Nvidia G-Sync.  It suffers from bleaching and a weird (inaccurate) gamma curve caused by the contrast being set too high (reducing contrast from 50 to 42 fixes this according to Toms Hardware), otherwise it is pretty much the same as the Asus PG27AQ which has better color presets.

Review by TFT Central
Review by Tom's Hardware


Acer PE270K


-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel

Review by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=)
Review by IBXT
Review by PRAD

Accurate (excluding the unit PRAD tested which came with very high, black crush causing 2.6 average gamma) matte 4K four sided border-less LG AH-IPS panel with AMD Free-Sync, height adjustable stand, a monitor hood and 4x USB 3.0 ports.


Acer X27

Review by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=)
Review by Dmitry Vasiliev
Review and Measurements by Belgium Hardware
Review by IBXT
Review by Lim's Cave
Review by PC Mag
Review by Rtings
Review by TECHSPOT
Review by Tom's Hardware
Review by Trusted Reviews

Matte 4K AHVA panel with 98hz (8 Bit +FRC / 10 bit HDR 4:4:4), Nvidia G-Sync, height adjustable stand, 4x USB 3.0, 384 zone local dimming and true HDR color.  Proper color (YcBcr 4:4:4) is only supported up to 98hz.  Image quality is degraded at 99-144hz.


Acer Nitro XV273K

Measurements and Review by Belgium Hardware
Review by IT Hardware PL
Review by PRAD
Pro Hardware
Review by Sweclockers
Review by TECHSPOT (least accurate)
Review by TFT Central
Review by Tom's Hardware (least accurate)

The Acer XV273K has an accurate 144hz (achievable only when connected with 2x Displayport cables) 3840x2160 or 4K matte wide gamut AUO HAVA panel which can cover 97% of the DCI-P3 color space, and can fully cover the sRGB color space to prevent over-saturation when the sRGB mode is available.  It has a fully adjustable stand, a monitor hood, 2x Displayport, 2x HDMI 2.0,4x USB 3.0 and a 3.5mm Audio Out.

The unit tested by TECHSPOT is has slightly too low preset gamma and inaccurate preset RGB Level balance which causes a preset rose-like tint of light greys and white.


Acer Nitro XB273K

*=Perceived black depth increasing matte black or grey (superior) bezel versus fake frame-less monitors perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel.
+=Variable back-light which increases the contrast ratio.

Review by PC Monitors
Pro Hardware
Review by Rtings
Review by Tom's Hardware

The Acer XB273K is a lower end version of the X27 and PG27UQ with slightly lower HDR color space coverage, lower maximum brightness (460cdm/2 vs 1000cdm/2), and inferior variable back-ligh dimming since the XB273K only has three dimming zones while the X27 and PG27UQ have 384 dimming zones.

The Acer XB273K has very accurate Standard mode preset  (SDR/sRGB & HDR color modes; color controls are locked when HDR is enabled), 144hz (compressed 4:2:2 YCbCr422 color signal called instead of 8 bit 4:4:4 YCbCr444 @120hz and 10 bit 4:4:4 YCbCr444 @98hz), 3840x2160 or 4K matte wide gamut AUO HAVA panel which can cover 87.65% of the DCI-P3 color space, provide 460cdmn/2 peak brightness, and can fully cover the sRGB color space to prevent over-saturation when the sRGB mode SDR Variable Back Light=On) settomg is selected.  It has a fully adjustable stand, a monitor hood, 1x Displayport, 1x HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0, 3.5mm Audio Out and Nvidia G-Sync.

Reading the monitors included manual and/or PC Monitors and Tom's Hardware's review is necessary in order to properly understand how to use a wide gamut monitor, and fully make use of all its features such as the back-light dimming (SDR Variable Back Light), and sRGB mode (SDR Colors sRGB) to prevent wide gamut color over-saturation.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 05:53:15 pm by NCX »

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AOC
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2017, 11:50:00 pm »
AOC

AOC AG271UG

Matte 4K with height adjustable stand and Nvidia G-Sync.

The AOC has low preset gamma averaging around 2.0 which results in dull colors, but can be improved by using the Gamma 3 and Shadow Control +1 setting.

Review By IT Hardware Poland


AOC U2777 UHD

Review by Playwares

Matte 3840x2160 LG AH-IPS panel with Displayport, Dual-Link DVI (3840x2160 @30hz), HDMI 2.0, VGA, 4x USB 3.0 and 3.5mm In & Out.  The preset gamma (Mode 1) has low preset gamma of 2.05 which results in the monitor being washed out.  Setting the Gamma to Mode 2 increases the accuracy and gamma average to 2.26 resulting in good image quality.  It has a 22ms delay (measured with the SMT Tool) versus <8ms for most competitors.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 06:32:56 pm by NCX »

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Asus
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2017, 11:51:11 pm »
Asus


Asus MX27UQ

Review by =DEAD=
Review by Les Numeriques
Review by PRAD

It performs well but it lacks VESA holes, is overpriced compared to the LG 27MU67 which supports Free-Sync and offers the same performance.


Asus PB279Q

Review by Digital Versus
Review by Extrahardware CZ
Review by =DEAD=
Review by PRAD
Review by Pure PC PL


Asus PG27AQ

It has better color presets than the Acer XB271HK which also has Nvidia G-Sync.

Review by =DEAD=
Review by Hardware Info
Review by PC Monitors
Review by Playwares
Review by PRAD


Asus PB27UQ

2017 successor to the PB279Q with HDMI 2.0 (x1) and AMD Free-Sync (40-60hz range). The PB27UQ has a perceived black depth increasing dark matte grey bezel.

Review by PRAD


Asus PG27UQ

Review by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=)
Review by Belgium Hardware and Measurements
Review by Les Numeriques
Review by IT Hardware PL
Review by PC Monitors
Review by Playwares
Review by PRAD
Review by Sweclockers
Review by TECHSPOT
Review by TFT Central
Review by Trusted Reviews

Matte 4K AHVA panel with 98hz (8 Bit +FRC / 10 bit HDR 4:4:4), Nvidia G-Sync, height adjustable stand, 4x USB 3.0, 384 zone local dimming and true HDR color.  Proper color (YcBcr 4:4:4) is only supported up to 98hz.  Image quality is degraded at 99-144hz.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2019, 09:43:43 pm by NCX »

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BenQ
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2017, 11:51:59 pm »
BenQ

BenQ BL2711U

Measurements and Review by Belgium Hardware  (1.9ms delay)
Review By IBXT (20ms delay)

Matte 27" 4K IPS with Displayport, Dual-Link DVI (4K @30hz), 1x HDMI 1.4 (4K @30hz) 1x HDMI 2.0 (limited to YCbCr 4:2:0), 4x USB 3.0, 3.5mm Audio Out, a fully adjustable stand and a perceived black depth increasing dark matte grey bezel.  It's fairly accurate aside from a strong preset blue tint.  The unit tested by Belgium Hardware is less accurate, but has lower input lag (2ms) than the unit tested by IBXT in 2015 (20ms).


BenQ SW271

Review by Tom's Hardware

Matte 4K wide gamut AUO AHVA panel with hardware calibration (BenQ Palette Master Element), a height adjustable stand, (), Adobe RGB (97.8) and decent HDR (89% + 350cdm/2 max brightness; color controls are locked when HDR is enabled) support.  It also has Displayport, 2x HDMI 2.0, a fake frame-less casing with a perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel, an SD Card Reader and 2x USB 3.0 and USB-C

The HDR mode locks the color controls and suffers from a light preset blue tint, and the other important modes (aRGB, REC 709 and sRGB) suffer from a light preset green tint meant to adhere to the DCI 1.2 standard:

Quote from: Tom's Hardware
Choosing one of the SW271’s color presets reduces calibration options. We could still pick from fixed color temps and gamma curves, but the RGB sliders were locked out. We opted for the two Custom memories where we created calibrations for DCI-P3 and sRGB.

The first three charts show results for Adobe RGB, DCI-P3 and sRGB modes. BenQ’s default DCI-P3 mode conforms to the film version (DCI 1.2), which has a greenish cast. This is meant to offset the color temperature of the xenon bulbs used in large commercial projectors, which are deficient in green. If you want a DCI preset with D65 white, you’ll need to create it yourself. Our chart takes this into account, which is why it looks the same as the others. In general, the fixed modes were a bit green at the higher brightness steps. Out-of-box grayscale accuracy is the SW271’s one weakness.

Fortunately, fixing it required just 30 seconds with the RGB sliders. The last two charts are among the best results we’ve ever captured and why we consider the SW271 reference-level. When properly set up, it can be used to dial in color meters, pattern generators, or other measurement equipment. It truly doesn’t get better than this.


BenQ PD2700U

Review by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=)
Review by Playwares
Review by Tom's Hardware

Very accurate matte 3840x2160 AH-IPS in a fake frame-less casing with a fully adjustable stand, Displayport, mini-Displayport, HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0 Downstream, 2x USB 3.0 Upstream and a 3.5mm Audio Out.  It has an HDR emulation mode, but lacks a wide gamut panel required to properly support HDR.


BenQ PD2720U

Review by =DEAD=
Review by Playwares

Matte, fully adjust-able wide gamut 3840x2160 LG AH-IPS with a 14 bit 3D Look Up Table, Displayport, 2x HDMI 2.0, 2x USB-C, 2x USB 3.1, 3.5mm Audio Out and a fake border or frame-less bezel with a perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel.  The default M-Book picture mode uses the monitors native wide gamut which vastly over-saturates the color of non-HDR (sRB HDTV/REC709) content while the sRGB mode under-saturates SDR color by 5% when set to the sRGB emulation Picture Mode.  The BenQ SW271 is a better choice since supports hardware calibration (with a compatible colorimeter) and has a better sRGB mode.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2019, 09:01:07 pm by NCX »

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Crossover
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2017, 11:52:29 pm »
Crossover
« Last Edit: October 02, 2018, 10:44:55 pm by NCX »

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Dell
« Reply #13 on: July 31, 2017, 11:53:16 pm »
Dell

Dell P2715Q

Review by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=)
Measurements By Belgium Hardware

Units made before March 2016 (revisions A00 to A02) have HDMI 1.4 which is limited to 30hz @4K while A03 revisions and higher have HDMI 2.0 which supports 4K @60hz, but HDMI 2.0 support must be enabled manually in the menu. Dell put out an article with this information and instructions on how to enable HDMI 2.0.


Dell UP2718Q

Review by Les Numeriques (10ms middle screen Leo Bodnar lag measurement)
Review by TFT Central (25ms SMT Tool lag measurement)
Review by Tom's Hardware

Matte 4K AH-IPS with local dimming, 1000cdm/2 brightness and HDR Color.


Dell U2718Q

Measurements and Review by Belgium Hardware
Review by Rtings

Fairly accurate matte 4K LG AH-IPS with height adjustable stand, Displayport, HDMI 2.0, mini Displayport, 4x USB 3.0 ports and 3.5mm Audio Out.  It's not as accurate as well as more reflective than the P2715Q which also has a perceived black depth increasing dark matte grey bezel versus the U2718Q's fake frame-less casing's black bezel. The Dell uses LED PWM Dimming or Flicker which decreases motion clarity and may cause some people to suffer from health issues such as eyestrain and/or headaches.

Quote from: Rtings
The Dell U2718Q uses a dual PWM flicker to dim the backlight. There is a 10 kHz flicker that is always present, but this flicker is not visible at all. There is a secondary flicker at 650 Hz, but due to the secondary wave the backlight does not completely shut off
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 02:18:37 am by NCX »

NCX

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Eizo
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2017, 12:05:38 am »
Eizo

Eizo EV2785

Matte with height adjustable stand and very accurate color presets, but very high input lag of 28ms versus 3-5ms for competitors (top screen Leo Bodnar device measurement)

Review by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=)
Review By Belgium Hardware & Measurements
Review by PRAD
« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 04:32:42 pm by NCX »