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Messages - NCX

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31
I really don't know if there is a real input lag difference between these two

Most monitors have so-low-it's negligible amounts of input lag (<5ms) these days, including the AOC and ViewSonic.  The main difference between AHVA/IPS/PLS and TN panels is the pixel response time difference (amount of ghosting; TN are faster) and image quality.  If set at the correct height the AOC offers vastly superior image quality to the ViewSonic, and the AOC's pixel response times are fast enough to satisfy the vast majority of players.  Compare the AOC to the ViewSonic XG240R which has nearly identical pixel response time performance with the VX2458:


From PC Monitors Review

32
with the IPS panel the best is the 27UK650, even better than the 27UL650?

They're basically the same monitor, as is the UL550, but the 550 had a perceived black depth increasing matte grey bezel versus the 650 and 850's perceived black depth decreasing inner black or fake frame-less casing's bezel.

The tested monitors are all ranked in the Best Monitor sections of my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 4-5K AHVA/IPS/PLS buying guide.

As I understand Philips does not have FreeSync  276E8VJSB

Correct, and the PS4 Pro does not support Free-Sync.  If you really want Free-Sync the ViewSonic XG2700-4K supports it, is very accurate and has a perceived black depth increasing grey bezel.  It uses an older panel (my VP2780-3K uses the same panel which I compared to the UL550) with a bit more glow than the UL550, but you probably will not notice unless your room lighting is very dim.

If the panel is VA then the best would be the EW3270U
 

Best for non-HDR content.  If some over-saturation is not a bother the Philips is better since it has back-light dimming and superior HDR color.

What about the LG 32uk550? nothing is said and is very well priced for the features that it has, right?

Untested. 

I would like the monitor to be HDR.

Nearly full HDR support from monitors costs >1500.  In this price range the HDR support offered by monitors is <30% and I would choose the Philips 276E8VJSB over every 4K monitor under 1000$ aside from the BenQ PD3200U and ViewSonic XG2700-4K.

33
I am in doubt among these monitors. Which would you choose in relation to price quality?

The 27UK650 is the best in terms of pricing, image quality and performance, but the Philips 276E8VJSB (review links) is better (more accurate and one of the most accurate monitors under 1000) and usually cheaper. 

If after a VA panel the BenQ (review links) is better than the Philips (it under-saturates color when set to the sRGB mode) while there are no reviews of the LG 32UL750.  The Philips has superior HDR color performance versus the BenQ, while the BenQ is better for non-HDR content, which is most content. None of the sub 800 27" 4K monitors properly support HDR, so if HDR color is a priority VA is the way to go.

AHVA/IPS/PLS versus VA comes down to personal preference; I vastly prefer AHVA/IPS/PLS's lack of horizontal gamma shift and slightly faster pixel response times versus VA panels higher contrast and HDR color support in the budget arena. AHVA/IPS/PLS versus VA image quality comparisons

34
Support NCX, About NCX & Site Update Log / Re: Site Update Log
« on: November 03, 2019, 03:11:57 pm »
AOC 2777 IPS 75

Added the Review by Playwares to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 1080p 27" IPS/PLS Monitor buying guide.

Matte 1920x1080 75hz IPS panel with AMD Free-Sync (48-75hz), Displayport, 2x HDMI, VGA and 3.5mm Audio In & Out.  The AOC can not fully cover the SDR (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) color spaces, and is quite accurate aside from a preset blue tint (7400k color temperature), has negligible (<3ms measured by Playwares with the SMT Tool) input lag and very fast pixel response times (Medium overdrive setting) for a 75hz non-TN panel.


Asus PA32UCX-K

Added the Review by PRAD to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 32" 4K AHVA/IPS/PLS buying guide

Matte fully adjustable 3840x2160, wide gamut/HDR panel with Back-light Dimming, Displayport, Hardware Calibration (Asus ProArt which does not work properly), 3x HDMI 2.0, 2x Thunderbolt USB-C (1 In & 1 Out), 3x USB 3.1 and Uniformity Compensation which reduces the contrast and does not work very well.  The PA32UCX-K is quite accurate (2.14 preset gamma is disappointing for the price), but needs to be set to the sRGB mode to prevent the over-saturation of SDR (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) content since the PA32UCX-K uses a an HDR-capable wide gamut panel which is preset to use the native DCI-P3/HDR color space.  The PA32UCX-K's color temperature changes and normalizes over a period of two hours when turned on after calibration, as well as suffers from varying color accuracy depending on how long it is turned on and which settings are changed.  The Asus has low input lag and fast pixel response times (for a 60hz non-TN panel) with minimal overshoot ghosting when the preset Trace Free 60 setting is used, and almost full HDR support thanks to the 1152 zone back-light dimming, 1500cdm/2 maximum brightness and wide gamut panel. The PA32UCX-K is a good 60hz gaming and media viewing display, especially once calibrated, but is not suitable for professional use over monitors from Eizo and NEC due to the Asus's improperly working hardware calibration (ProArt) and Uniformity compensation modes, and color-changing issues which occur over time after being turned on, and when settings are changed.


Gigabyte Aorus CV27F

Added the Measurements and Review by Belgium Hardware to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1080p Monitors buying guide.

Curved, matte, 1920x1080 165hz and semi-wide gamut (127.2% sRGB or 27% sRGB over-saturation) VA panel with AMD Free-Sync (48-165hz range), Displayport (144hz), 2x HDMI 2.0 (144hz), 2x USB 3.0 and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The Gigabute CV27F is fairly accurate (discounting the semi-wide gamut panel over-saturation), but has slightly too low preset gamma (less than 2.1 for 0-100% white) which results in greys and white being too light, or washed out.  The CV27F has an sRGB mode to prevent the over-saturation of SDR (HDTV/REC 709 and sRGB content) color, but IT Hardware PL did not provide color space measurements for the sRGB mode, or much information on the overdrive/pixel response time performance.  The CV27F supports HDR, but lacks all of the features required to provide good performance, which is normal and to be expected from budget monitors.


Gigabyte Aorus CV27Q

Added the Measurements and Review by Belgium Hardware to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1440p Monitors buying guide.

Matte, curved (1500R), wide gamut, 2560x1440 165hz VA panel with a height adjustable stand, AMD Free-Sync, Displayport (48-165hz Free-Sync range), 2x HDMI 2.0 (48-165hz Free-Sync range). 2x USB 3.0 and 3.5mm Audio In & Out.  The Gigabyte has very high 7,000:1 contrast (5,700:1 after calibration), very accurate color presets (the only issue is a preset blue dominance) for DCI-P3, or HDR content.  The CV27Q has a wide gamut panel which over-saturates the color of SDR (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) content significantly (30%), and its sRGB mode is quite inaccurate and not useful even though it does reduce the over-saturation.  The HDR mode suffers from a strong preset green tint which can not be reduced since the color controls are locked.  The CV27Q has low input lag and fast pixel response times for a VA panel.


Gigabyte Aorus FI27Q

Added the Measurements and Review by Belgium Hardware to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144-165hz 1440p Monitors buying guide.

Fully adjust-able matte 2560x1440, 165hz wide gamut/HDR IPS panel with AMD Free-Sync, Displayport, 2x HDMI, 2x USB 2.0 and 3.5mm Audio In & Out.  The FI27Q over-saturates the color of SDR (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) out of the box since it has a wide gamut panel which tries to cover the DCI-P3 (HDR) color space.  The sRGB emulation mode significantly reduces the gamma and RGB level color accuracy (Standard versus sRGB), as well as looks washed out since the sRGB mode's gamma is too low.  The FI27Q has negligible input lag and less (2.7%) overshoot ghosting than the AD27Q (20%), but slower pixel response times resulting in more color streaking or ghosting.


MSI Optix G27C4

Added the Review by Playwares and Review by Tom's Hardware to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1080p Monitors buying guides.

Matte 1920x1080 165hz VA panel with AMD Free-Sync (48-165hz), Displayport, 2x HDMI 1.4, and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The MSI G27C4 suffers from a preset red tint, has washed out colors caused by the low preset gamma (1.98 average) and over-saturates the colors of SDR (HDTV/RED 709 & sRGB) media by over 20%.  The MSI G27C4 has fast pixel response times and low input lag, but has bad image quality. 


ViewSonic XG270QG

Added the Review by PC Monitors to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144-165hz 1440p Monitors and Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 1440p AHVA/IPS/PLS buying guides.

Matte, fully adjust-able, 165hz, HDR/wide gamut, 2560x1440 resolution IPS* panel with G-Sync and 120hz ULMB (back-light strobing) over Displayport.  The ViewSonic XG270QG has Displayport, HDMI 1.4, 3x USB 3.0 and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The XG270QG is very accurate aside from a slight warm preset green tint, and can fully cover the SDR (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) color spaces, but has average contrast (850:1) and over-saturates the color of non DCI-P3 content (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) since it uses a wide gamut and HDR capable panel without a properly functioning sRGB emulation mode.  The ViewSonic XG270QG has negligible input lag and fast pixel response times for a non-TN panel at all refresh rates with the response time is set to the Standard (no overshoot) and Advanced (faster but with minor overshoot) settings.

35
Best Reviewed Flicker Free Monitor Buying Guides / Viotek
« on: November 03, 2019, 02:26:17 pm »
Viotek

Viotek GFT27DB

Review by Techspot

Matte 144hz 2560x1440 semi-wide gamut and 8 bit AUO TN panel with low preset gamma (2.04 average), a preset blue dominance and wide gamut color over-saturation of non-HDR content since the Viotek lacks an SDR color space (HDTV/REC 709 or sRGB) emulation mode.

36
Best Reviewed Flicker Free Monitor Buying Guides / Yamakasi
« on: November 03, 2019, 02:21:00 pm »
X-Star

Glossy X-Star DP2710

Review by NCX

Discontinued 2013 2560x1440 Samsung PLS panel. It's the same as the Qnix QX2710 which along with X-Star is part of the same company.

37
Support NCX, About NCX & Site Update Log / Re: Site Update Log
« on: November 02, 2019, 07:42:05 pm »
AOC 24G2U

Added the Measurements and Review by Belgium Hardware, and the Review by PC Monitors to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 24-25" 1080p IPS/PLS Monitors and Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1080p Monitors buying guides.

Matte 1920x1080 144hz, 6 bit +FRC IPS (Panda LC238LF1F IGZO IPS) panel with a fully adjust-able stand, AMD Free-Sync, back-light strobing (MBR), Displayport (G-Sync compatible Free-Sync), 2x HDMI 1.4, 4x USB 3.0, and 3.5mm Audio In & Out.  The AOC is quite accurate, has high contrast (1400-1500:1), but suffers from a minor preset green tint of greys and whites.  The 24G2U has negligible input lag (<4ms measured with the SMT Tool) and very well tuned overdrive when the Overdrive is set to Medium at 60hz and Strong at 144hz.


AOC 27G2U

Added the Measurements and Review by Belgium Hardware to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1080p Monitors and Best Reviewed Flicker Free 1080p 27" IPS/PLS Monitor buying guides.

Matte 1920x1080 144hz IPS panel with a fully adjust-able stand, AMD Free-Sync (50-144hz), back-light strobing (MBR), Displayport (G-Sync compatible Free-Sync), 2x HDMI 1.4, 4x USB 3.0, and 3.5mm Audio In & Out.  The AOC is quite accurate, has high contrast (1350:1), but suffers from a minor preset green tint of greys and whites.  The 27G2U has negligible input lag and very well tuned overdrive when the Overdrive is set to Medium which is the default setting.


AOC U2790PQU

Added the Measurements, Review by Belgium Hardware, the Review by Les Numeriques and the Review by PRAD to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 4-5K AHVA/IPS/PLS buying guide.

Fully adjust-able, matte 3840x2160 IPS panel with Displayport, HDMI.  The AOC has good preset RGB level accuracy, a 1.8 preset gamma average resulting in very washed out image quality which can be improved by changing the gamma from mode 1 to mode 3.  The AOC has low input lag and good overdrive for a 60hz non-TN panel when the default Middle overdrive setting is selected.  The AOC supports judder free 24hz blu ray play back, and supports 3:2 and 2:2 pull down for interlaced content.


Asus MX279HS

Added the Review by Rtings to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 1080p IPS/PLS Monitors buying guide.

Matte 1920x1080 IPS panel with Displayport, 2x HDMI, VGA and 3.5mm Audio In & Out.  The MX279HS is fairly accurate, but can not fully cover the SDR (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) color spaces, and has slightly too high gamma in the 0-50% white range which causes dark greys and some colors to be too dark, as well as loss of detail in dark scenes (black crush).  The MX279HS has very low input lag for a 60hz display, but suffers from obvious overshoot ghosting if the overdrive or Trace Free control is not reduced from 60 to zero.  The MX279HS is decent, but not good enough to recommend over the competition, especially since it suffers from the same preset gamma flaws as its predecessor the MX279H.


Asus VG279Q

Added the Review by =DEAD= and IT Hardware PL to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 1080p IPS/PLS Monitors and Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1080p Monitors buying guides.

Fully adjust-able matte 1920x1080 144hz AUO AHVA panel with AMD Free-Sync (48-144hz), Displayport, Dual-Link DVI (120hz), HDMI, 3.5mm Audio In & Out.  The Asus can fully covers, as well as slightly over-saturates colors of the HDTV/REC 709 and sRGB (SDR) color spaces, and has accurate color presets overall (default=Game Visual MOBA), which can be marginally improved by setting the Low Blue Light Filter to Level 1.  As expected, the Asus has very fast pixel response times with minimal overshoot, even when using the default overdrive (Trace Free 60) setting, and has negligible input lag (4-5ms measured by Playwares with the SMT Tool 2.0 vs a CRT).


Asus VG27AQ

Added the Review by =DEAD=, Review by Les Numeriques and the Review by TFT Central to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144-165hz 1440p Monitors and Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 1440p AHVA/IPS/PLS buying guides.

The VG27AQ is a fully adjust-able, matte, 144hz (over-clocks to 165hz over Displayport), 2560x1440 AUO AHVA panel with AMD Free-Sync (48-165hz range), back-light strobing (ELMB) Displayport (over-clock-able to 165hz), 2x HDMI 2.0 and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The VG27AQ has very accurate preset color accuracy (Racing Mode), and has very low or negligible input lag.  The VG27AQ needs to have the overdrive (Trace Free) reduced from 60 to 0 to get rid of excessive overshoot ghosting at 60hz and has slow pixel response times at 60hz, but performs well at 144, 155 and 165hz when the over drive (Trace Free) setting is kept to the default 60 setting.  TFT Central provides Trace Free 80 measurements which prove that the VG27AQ suffers from over 20ms of overshoot ghosting during many transitions which I find unacceptable which is why I recommend using Trace Free 60.


BenQ Zowie XL2411P

Added the Review by Rtings to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1080p Monitors buying guide.

Matte 1920x1080 144hz TN panel with back-light strobing, Displayport, Dual-Link, DVI, HDMI 2.0 and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The XL2411P has abysmal preset color accuracy unless switched to the Standard (unlocked color controls) Picture mode which is the only one which unlocks the color controls and offers passable preset color accuracy.  The XL2411P has negligible input lag, but suffers from obvious overshoot ghosting (default AMA High overdrive setting) or slower pixel response times (AMA Off) versus multiple similarly priced and more accurate TN competitors.


Dell S2419HGF

Added the Review by Rtings to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1080p Monitors buying guide.

Matte 1920x1080 144hz TN panel with AMD Free-Sync, Displayport, Dual-Link, 2x HDMI 2.0, 2x USB 3.0, and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The S2419HGF has passable preset color accuracy, but suffers from black crush (reduced detail in dark content) caused by the high average (2.43) gamma, and suffers from red, green and blue under-saturation.  The S2419HGF has negligible input lag, and extremely balanced (minimal overshoot ghosting) and fast pixel response times when the default Normal Response Time setting is used.


Gigabyte Aorus CV27Q

Added the Review by Tom's Hardware to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1440p Monitors buying guide.

Matte, curved (1500R), wide gamut, 2560x1440 165hz VA panel with a height adjustable stand, AMD Free-Sync, Displayport (48-165hz Free-Sync range), 2x HDMI 2.0 (48-165hz Free-Sync range). 2x USB 3.0 and 3.5mm Audio In & Out.  The Gigabyte has very high 7,000:1 contrast (5,700:1 after calibration), very accurate color presets (the only issue is a very minor preset blue dominance) for DCI-P3, or HDR content.  The CV27Q has a wide gamut panel which over-saturates the color of SDR (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) content significantly (30%), and its sRGB mode is quite inaccurate and not useful even though it does reduce the over-saturation.  The HDR mode suffers from a strong preset green tint which can not be reduced since the color controls are locked.  The CV27Q has low input lag and fast pixel response times for a VA panel.


HP EliteDisplay E273d

Added the Review by IBXT to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 1080p IPS/PLS Monitors buying guide.

Matte, fully adjust-able 1920x1080 LG IPS panel with Displayport, HDMI, USB-C, 4x USB 3.1, VGA, and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The 273d is accurate, has fast pixel response times for a 60hz non-Tn panel and low input lag as long as the USB Link mode (40ms delay) is not used


Iiyama ProLite XB3288UHSU

Added the Measurements, Review by Belgium Hardware to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 32" 4K AHVA/IPS/PLS buying guide

Fully adjust-able, matte 3840x2160, wide gamut VA panel with 38-60hz AMD Free-Sync, Displayport, 2x HDMI 2.0, 2x USB 3.0, and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The iiyama is fairly accurate, but suffers from a minor preset green tint and does not and does not have a properly functioning color space emulation mode to prevent SDR (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) content over-saturation since the iiyama covers the DCI-P3 (HDR) color space natively.  The iiyama has negligible input lag and fast pixel response times for a 60hz VA panel.


LG 24GL600F

Added the Review by Rtings to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144hz 1080p Monitors buying guide.

Matte 1920x1080 144hz TN panel with AMD Free-Sync (20-144hz), Displayport, Dual-Link, 2x HDMI 2.0, and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The LG 24GL600F has passable preset color accuracy, but suffers from a preset blue tint and has slightly washed out colors since the gamma is non-linear and too low (2.06 average).  The 24GL600F has negligibly input lag and very fast (top tier) pixel response times.


Philips 329P9H

Added the Review by Global HD to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 32" 4K AHVA/IPS/PLS buying guide

Matte fully adjustable 3840x2160 LG AH-IPS panel with Displayport In & Out, Gigabyte-LAN port, 2x HDMI 2.0, USB-C 3.1, 4x USB 3.1.  The Philips has accurate preset gamma and 1300:1 contrast, but inaccurate preset RGB levels and a 25ms signal delay which is almost a two frame delay (32ms), which is far too high for competitive 60hz gaming, but is fine for casual gaming and in line with most TV's.


Razer Raptor 27

Added the Review by Tom's Hardware to my Best Reviewed Flicker Free 144-165hz 1440p Monitors and Best Reviewed Flicker Free 27" 1440p AHVA/IPS/PLS buying guides.

Matte, fully adjust-able, 144hz, HDR/wide gamut, 2560x1440 resolution IPS* panel with AMD Free-Sync and G-Sync compatibility.  The Razer Raptor has Displayport, 2x HDMI 2.0, USB-C and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The Razer is very accurate, but has a slight preset red tint and over-saturates the color of non DCI-P3 content (HDTV/REC 709 & sRGB) by 36% since it uses a wide gamut and HDR capable panel without a properly functioning sRGB emulation mode.  The HDR mode is more accurate than the SDR modes, and the Razer has negligible input lag and fast pixel response times for a non-TN panel.

38
Hello NCX,

What do you normally set the contrast to on your monitor?

Default unless the reviewer specifically mentions that changing it will improve the color accuracy.  I always check the Lagom White Saturation page for contrast issues, such as green, pink or red tinting of the grey and white squares, though the color dominance may also or independently be caused by the red, green or blue color controls.

39
Support NCX, About NCX & Site Update Log / Re: Site Update Log
« on: October 26, 2019, 01:15:26 pm »
xxx

40
The glow\bleed though.. I checked some videos and I quite dislike it.
Dark scenes aren't exactly uncommon in movies.

If you follow my display brightness, height and lighting recommendations glow is not a problem

Also, I imagine it's going to get worse in time.

It does not, and back-light bleed can decrease over time once the monitor is setup and no longer has pressure put on it by the box which can warp the panel slightly and cause or increase bleed.

Do you have any additional recommendations at lower refresh rates?

I recommended the Samsung S24E650P which is one of the best (under 500$) and cheapest monitors around; the rest of my recommendations are in my buying guides and I don't recommended 60hz TN or VA panels. 


Right now I am using a 1600 lumen Feit 3000K "Warm White" A19 blub. The monitor's brightness is set at 22%. I experience some eye strain. I want to get a brighter bulb (maybe 2500 lumen) but I can't find an A19 with a 3000K color temperature.

The color temperature of the bias light doesn't matter, you have the brightness to light ration correct, and I bet you will dislike reducing the display brightness more since it's already set to around 80cdm/2 based on the measurements by PCM and TFTC.

As an alternative I could get a 2500 lumen 5000k bulb

Brighter bias lighting will improve the perceived black depth, but also make it harder to see details in dark scenes, and make the display appear dimmer.  Consider putting silver tape (I use 3$ Silver 3M Scotch Expressions Washi Tape) on the inner black bezel to vastly increase the perceived black without making details in dark content harder to see. 

I've been using this tape for over year and have removed and re-applied it a few times to see if it leaves residue.  Here's my HP 24 Envy with and without silver tape:

Spoiler (hover to show)

Bright grey, silver and white bezels and tape are the best way to improve the perceived black depth, which is something I wish I knew years ago since I would have bought a few rolls of 3$ tape instead of spending money and time on lights and spray painting bezels. 

Ocushield to block the blue light.
 
Standard gamut (most low and mid range) LCD panels are lit by blue W-LED's which are painted yellow to appear white, and putting a filter (Gunnar glasses or Occushield) over the screen or in front of ones eyes is similar to using sunglasses, so you'll likely need to significantly increase the display brightness which is counter intuitive.  The OccuShield doesn't look like it makes displays look yellow like Gunnar glasses and Low Blue Light settings, but does make displays look a bit dimmer, and the OccuShield won't increase the perceived black depth since the U2417H's black bezel will still be black.  The only way to reduce Low Blue Light intake without reducing the brightness and/or image quality is to not use a W-LED back-lit display.

41
I think the Asus VG248QE had a good review by you and it's currently 200$.
It's a 144Hz and can be adjusted + rotated vertically (I'm short on space).
It doesn't include G-Sync (VG248QG has it at 250), but I don't think it's necessary here.

The VG248QE uses LED PWM Dimming so I can't recommend it, the VG248QG is untested, and both use TN panels.  The excellent AOC 24G2U (tested by PC Monitors) is the only tested 24" 144hz IPS panel while the rest use TN or VA panels.  Based on PC Monitors review, I think the 24G2U is one of the best monitors under 1000$.

If a second 144hz monitor is a must I can only recommend the AOC 24G2U and best 144hz VA panels since the Acer XB241H is equal or superior to the newest tested 24" TN panels.

AOC I2490PXQU seemed ok for my needs?

The Samsung S24E650PL is significantly better, and so is the AOC 24G2U.

I'm curious about IPS, but I'd hate to see glow\bleed on my display.


All displays can suffer from back-light bleed and glow, and AHVA/IPS/PLS glow is a panel flaw with which can nearly be completely reduced by changing their display height and not viewing them same way as a TN panel:

IPS vs TN: Right & Wrong Ways To Use Or View; How To Vastly Reduce AHVA/IPS/PLS Glow & Increase The Perceived Black Depth

Back-light bleed can often be reduced to nearly imperceptible amount by not cranking the display brightness and placing the display at the correct height.  Also it's unrealistic to expect to get a completely back-light bleed free display for under 1000$, though it does happen.

Display Brightness & Room Lighting: The Importance Of Light



42
Support NCX, About NCX & Site Update Log / Re: Site Update Log
« on: October 19, 2019, 12:18:37 pm »
xxx

43
I am looking to get a 27" 1440p 144hz monitor for both gaming and media creation. I game pretty much across the board and need to use programs like photoshop and rhino for work.

All TN panels (S2719DGF which can come with low preset gamma or washed out colors) are unsuitable for work which requires color accuracy since they suffer from vertically uneven colors and shades (gamma shift which results in washed out image quality), but there are multiple non-TN options in this price range.  If in the US the 330$ Acer XF270HU is the best option since the newer models in the price range are worse since they use Innolux IPS panels with more ghosting (slower pixel response times) versus the AHVA panel in the XF270HU.  More alternatives:

Best 144-165hz 1440p Monitors with Free-Sync

44
The Samsung is about 198 USD while the AOC is 137 USD. The used Samsung one is 101 USD

I'm also considering the AOC I2490VXQ and BenQ GW2480. Which one is the best, the BenQ GW2480, 24v2Q or the I2490VXQ?

If the 100$ Samsung is the renewed and Prime backed model from Amazon I'd try it out since they have a 30 day no hassle return policy, though they did drop the price of a new unit to 164$.

The 242Q is the best since it has slightly better preset color accuracy (gamma) than the I2490VXQ.  The BenQ is the slowest of the three and doesn't offer superior performance in any category. 

45
I was going to ask if a high contrast would be relevant to my needs but if high brightness increases BLB i guess i don't need higher brightness that much.

The higher the contrast the better, assuming the panel has uniform brightness and color distribution rather than just a high contrast center which is common.  AHVA/IPS/PLS with >1200:1 are very rare, and the same two panels may (less likely now, but used to be expected from pre 2012 panels) have up to a 40% contrast ratio variance.  Reduced glow and uniformity are superior to a high contrast panel with more glow and back-light bleed.

What rise + fall response time will avoid ghosting and is good for casual gaming?

Oscilloscope measurements and photos can prove all 60hz LCD panels, many CRT's and plasma's suffer from ghosting (color streaking for fast pixel response times and smearing for long pixel reaction times) or phosphor trailing (CRT and plasma) which must not be confused with sample and hold motion blur which both LCD and OLED suffer from, and is reduced by increasing the refresh rate (60 to 75 to 120hz, ect). 

Almost all AHVA/IPS/PLS panels are fast enough for the majority (which you may not be part of)...those who are not using a high refresh rate CRT or overshoot ghosting and PWM blur free TN.

Is 18,4 ms good enough on a 75Hz monitor? What about 14ms on a 60Hz?

I can't answer this for you, but can guess YES if you're not using a PWM blur free TN without overshoot.

My monitor (Qnix QX2710) versus the Acer X27 whose response times you can look up here.  I also use an HP 24 Envy which is very similar to the AOC and significantly faster than my Qnix.  I always notice the response time flaws, including flaws from the fastest TN panels, but I can't stand using them, which is a common opinion from AHVA/IPS/PLS panel owners.

Is it a bad idea to use the AOC 24V2Q for gaming or is it good enough?

PC Lab PL measured 7.5ms for the TN panel in the BenQ GL2580...which is a Far Cry off the claimed 1ms response time.  I think the AOC is more than good enough, but if you want a significantly faster monitor buy a TN.

Should i get a second hand Samsung S24E650PL?

How much is a new Samsung versus AOC?  If PC gaming with a Free-Sync compatible graphics card the AOC is probably the better choice since it supports Free-Sync and 75hz, though the Samsung can probably overclocked to 71-75hz, has a height adjust-able stand, better image quality and is faster.  I can not recommend second hand monitors without knowing where they come from and what condition they come in.

What's SDR?

Standard Dynamic Range (HDTV/REC 709 and sRGB color space which are extremely similar and the color spaces most content uses) versus High Dynamic Range/HDR which is a form of wide gamut color quite different to the Adobe RGB standard.

fix the high response time on the AOC 24V2Q with the overdrive options?

Don't know, and the AOC response times are normal for AHVA/IPS/PLS.  Compare Playwares AOC measurements to a few others to be sure.

Are videos/movies/shows affected by ghosting, inverse ghosting, overshoot and other similar issues?

Everything is affected....but will most people notice?  No, especially in the case of the AOC as long as the overdrive is not set to the highest overshoot ghosting inducing setting.

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