Author Topic: HP 24 Envy Review: Semi-Glossy 1080p IPS with 75hz & AMD Free-Sync  (Read 606 times)

NCX

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2018: HP 25f Review: Almost-Glossy 75hz IPS with AMD Free-Sync: 25er & 25es successor with AMD Free-Sync, native 75hz, the fastest pixel response times, but worse color accuracy than the 25er & 25es, and lower color space coverage than the older models.

2017: HP 24 Envy Review: Semi-Glossy 1080p IPS with 75hz & AMD Free-Sync: The 24 Envy natively supports 75hz (no overclock required), can cover more of the HDTV/REC 709 color space than the 25-27" HP monitors, but is less accurate than the HP 25er and 25es.

2016: HP 25er/es Review: Non-overclock-able 2016 Almost-Glossy/Low Haze Monitors with slightly more accurate color presets, 2x HDMI and 1x VGA.

2015: HP 27CW, 25XW and 27XW Review: Overclock-able 2015 monitors with worse preset color accuracy than the 25er and 25es.

The 25" and 27" HP CW/er/es/XW series monitors all use the same almost-glossy (Low Haze) coating which HP describes as:

"The reflective-ness typical with glossy screen surface is appreciably reduced with the Low Haze Screen enhancement, without losing clarity and contrast of screen imagery."

HP 25-27VX: These monitors use LED PWM Dimming or Flicker which ruins motion clarity and makes some people suffer from health issues like headaches and/or eyestrain. The VX monitors have less vibrant colors since they have a smaller and less accurate color gamut capable of covering up to 92% of the sRGB color space versus the 25-27CW & XW monitors 97%, and use a pure glossy coating while the 25-27 CW & XW monitors use a treated glossy or almost-glossy coating with some ant-reflective properties.

Review Information and Methodology:

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« Last Edit: March 28, 2019, 06:32:28 pm by NCX »

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NCX

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The HP 24 Envy uses a new variant of the Almost Glossy or Low Haze coating the HP 25-27 CW/er/es/XW monitors use, and the 24 Envy has a thinner fake-frame-less casing which they named a four sided micro-edge frame. The HP 24 Envy has a short stand which only tilts, Displayport, HDMI and USB-C. It natively supports 75hz, as well as AMD Free-Sync (requires compatible AMD graphics card) and comes with a VESA stand adapter.

The Dell S2418H and S2718H also use the same border-less casing/bezel; close up of the S2718H from the Dell S2718H Review by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=).
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 06:22:53 pm by NCX »

NCX

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Menu & Set-Up

DSC_0439 by Dr NCX, on Flickr

Unlike the HP 25-27 CW/er/es/XW monitors the HP 24 Envy does not need to have its contrast reduced and only has one setting which needs to be changed which is the Video Overdrive setting which controls the monitors pixel response times. The Video Overdrive setting needs to be switched from Level 1 to Level 2, or 3; these settings are available under the Image Control Menu located in the main menu. For more information about the ghosting/overdrive/pixel response times refer to the Ghosting section of this review.

The AMD Free-Sync setting, Gaming - Free-Sync, in the Viewing Mode Menu must also be manually activated to enable Free-Sync with compatible AMD graphics cards and the Xbox One X.  The Gaming - Free-Sync setting locks the color (Red, Green and Blue) controls, but not the Brightness and Contrast settings, and it provides the same preset color accuracy as the default setting.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2019, 01:17:00 am by NCX »

NCX

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Flicker/PWM Dimming

DSC_0438 by Dr NCX, on Flickr

The HP 24 Envy, 25" & 27" HP CW/er/es/XW series monitors are not advertised as being Flicker Free even though they do not use LED PWM Dimming (read about the side effects), regardless of high or low the brightness is set. LED PWM Dimming was tested for using the Blur Busters Test UFO Blur Trail/PWM Test from 0-100% Brightness. The lack of PWM is a good thing since PWM or Flicker ruins motion clarity (example), and makes some people suffer from health issues such as headaches, and/or eyestrain.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2019, 01:20:39 am by NCX »

NCX

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The brightness range of the HP 24 Envy ranges between 53-255cdm/2 which is very similar to the HP 25-27 CW/er/es/XW monitors, and suitable for all lighting conditions aside from the brightest, such as outside on a sunny day or in an office with lots of windows on a bright sunny day. The 1000:1 contrast is average (1500:1 is outstanding while 1200:1 is great) for a modern AHVA/IPS/PLS panel and too low for use in a light-less room, especially if the brightness is set above 25 (100cdm/2).  The HP 25-27 CW/er/es/XW monitors contrast is a bit higher at 1100-1200:1, especially before reducing the Contrast from 80 to 75 to get rid of the green tint on light grey and white. 

Like most other 1080p IPS/PLS panels, the HP 24 Envy, HP CW, er, es and XW monitors have frame-less casings which have inner black glossy bezels or frames which reduce the perceived black depth, or makes black look light (greyish) by comparison, but bias lighting (lamp placed behind the display) can be used to negate the need for reflection inducing room lights, and vastly increase the perceived black depth.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2018, 01:26:22 am by NCX »

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Left: HP 24 Envy (Low Haze / Almost Glossy)
Center:HP 25er/es (Low Haze / Almost Glossy)
Right:Viewsonic VP2780-4k (Matte)

The HP 24 Envy uses a new glossy coating variant which has the characteristics of a traditional semi-glossy coating found on many TV's.  The coating is equally as clear as the Almost-Glossy or Low Haze coating the HP 25-27 CW/er/es/XW monitors use, but looks washed out under bright lighting.  HP describes the almost-glossy or Low Haze coating:

"The reflectiveness typical with glossy screen surface is appreciably reduced with the Low Haze Screen enhancement, without losing clarity and contrast of screen imagery."

The 24 Envy's semi-glossy coating looks a bit washed out under bright lighting, especially when display dark content since it turns light into a white haze.  Some colors along with black wide screen movies letter box bars look obviously washed out under bright lighting compared to the Almost-Glossy or Low Haze coating and fully glossy coatings.  The coating the 24 Envy uses is significantly worse than other glossy coatings under bright lighting, but looks great when used with bias lighting, or lights placed behind the display.  I strongly advise against using the 24 Envy without bias lighting, otherwise it will look washed out which defeats the purpose of owning a glossy monitor since one of the main perks of glossy coatings is the enhanced vibrancy compared to matte coatings.

Ceiling (direct) Light versus Bias Light

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Matte vs Low Haze vs Semi-Glossy with and without Bias Lighting

Top Left: Acer XB321HK (4K Matte AUO AHVA Panel)
Top Right: HP 25es (almost-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)
Bottom Left: HP 24 Envy with ceiling light (semi-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)
Bottom Rightt: HP 24 Envy bias light (semi-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)

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Matte vs Low Haze vs Semi-Glossy with and without Bias Lighting

Top Left: BenQ Zowie RL2460 (Matte 1080p AUO TN Panel)
Top Right: HP 25es (almost-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)
Bottom Left: HP 24 Envy with ceiling light (semi-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)
Bottom Rightt: HP 24 Envy bias light (semi-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)

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Glossy vs Low Haze vs Semi-Glossy with and without Bias Lighting

Top Left: SubGear (Glossy 1440p LG AH-IPS Panel)
Top Right: HP 25es (almost-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)
Bottom Left: HP 24 Envy with ceiling light (semi-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)
Bottom Rightt: HP 24 Envy bias light (semi-glossy 1080p LG AH-IPS)

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« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 03:22:40 pm by NCX »

NCX

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^The above compilation is of photos of the Test UFO Ghosting Test on the monitors featured in the compilation.  Click here to view the test.  This part of the review was updated in 2019.

Out of the box, or by default, the HP 24 Envy's Response Time (erroneously named Video Overdrive in my Test UFO Ghosting comparison above) or pixel response time setting is preset to Level 1 while the HP 25 er and es have theirs preset to Off, just like the HP 27CW, 25XW and 27XW I reviewed in 2015 and 2016.  The 24 Envy, 25er and 25es all offer extremely similar performance, the main difference being that the 24 Envy can natively overclock and has more Response Time settings.  The 25er and 25es perform best when Level 2 of 3 is used, while the 24 Envy does when Level 2 and 3 of 5 are used.  The 25er and es's Level 2 setting is most similar to the 24 Envy's Level 2 setting, and their Level 2 setting is essentially the same as the Video Overdrive On setting the CW and XW series monitors offer.  The 24 Envy's Level 2 and 3 Response Time setting offer fast pixel response times close to a good TN panel, but with some obvious overshoot ghosting on light blue, yellow and white transitions when Level 3 is used.  TN panels like BenQ Zowie RL2460 are indeed noticeably faster, but not significantly, and the increased speed or lesser amount of ghosting comes at a steep price which is TN panels vertical gamma shift and very restrictive viewing angles.  Vertical gamma shift causes the top quarter of TN panels to be too dark, and the bottom half to be washed out, which results in the vertical, or top to bottom unevenness of colors and shades, and reduced vibrancy compared to AHVA/IPS/PLS and VA panels.  TN panels also have very restrictive viewing angles which force one to only be able to look down at TN panels from above.  I think most will be satisfied with the performance of the 24 Envy which offers extremely similar performance to the HP 25 and 27 inch CW/er/es and XW monitors I reviewed, as well as many other AHVA/IPS/PLS performance at 60hz. 


The only IPS-type panel I tested which is noticeably faster is the Acer XB321HK with Nvidia G-Sync, but it costs nearly five times more.  Gamers who are only PC gaming may want to opt for a 144hz TN panel with significantly worse image quality like the LG 24GM79G or Viewsonic XG2401 and 2, or a 144hz VA panel like the Samsung C24FG70 and 73.  Those who want to use both a PC and console for gaming, as well as care about image quality or dislike TN panels should consider the Dell SE2717H and HP 24 Envy which both support AMD Free-Sync and 75hz natively, or the matte Philips 257E7QDSB which can be overclocked to 75hz.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2019, 02:14:13 am by NCX »

NCX

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Input Lag

DSC_0429
by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The HP 24 Envy and 25" & 27" CW/er/es/XW monitors can all be considered delay free (<3ms top screen Leo Bodnar measurement), but this is not surprising since most 1080p monitors are. Usually only multi-input 1440p-4k monitors have a around a frame (16.7ms) or two (33.33ms) of input lag. The Leo Bodnar device measures 9.8ms in the middle of the screen, but the Bodnar device has a built in delay and partially includes the monitors black-to-white pixel response times. Top screen Bodnar results are in the 3ms range, and both monitors tie with my CRT when using the SMT Tool. The actual signal delay (input lag without including the pixel response times) is likely less than a millisecond, but an oscilloscope is required to obtain the "true" value.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2018, 09:28:36 pm by NCX »

NCX

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The HP 24 Envy is preset to the Neutral setting under the Color Control menu, and its colors are the same at both 60 and 75hz, as well as when the Custom RGB setting (unlocks the Red, Green and Blue controls) is selected in the Color Control menu. The other HP 25-27 CW/er/es/XW monitors colors changed slightly when set to the Custom RGB mode and when their refresh rate was changed. The 24 Envy also does not suffer from a blue or green tint when viewing the White Saturation Lagom page; the 24 Envy does not need to have its contrast reduced from 80 to 75 to get rid of the blue or green tint to greys.

HCFR Color Preset Measurements

-HP 24 Envy: Almost-Glossy/Low Haze LG AH-IPS (made in 2017)
-HP 25er: Almost-Glossy/Low Haze LG AH-IPS (made in 2016)
-HP 25XW: Almost-Glossy/Low Haze LG AH-IPS (made in 2015)
-Philips 245C5Q: Matte 1080p LG AH-IPS (made in 2016)
-Viewsonic VP2770: Matte 1440p Samsung PLS (made in 2012; tested in 2017)
-Viewsonic VP2780: Matte 4K LG AH-IPS

HCFR Grey Scale
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HCFR Gamma
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HCFR RGB Levels
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HCFR Color Temperature
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HCFR CIE Diagram
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There is no way to further improve the preset color accuracy of the HP 24 Envy, and aside from the Contrast issue mentioned above, the 24 Envy is slightly less accurate than the 25er/es I reviewed since the 24 Envy suffers from a stronger, but still mild preset blue and green tint. Another issue shared by a few other 24" 1080p IPS/PLS panels is the presence of <1mm thick vertical black lines which span from top to bottom of the panel when viewing some light colors such as light blue, grey and orange. Despite having gamed (Bloodborne, Destiny & Overwatch) on the 24 Envy for dozens of hours and looking at dozens of screen shots I did not notice the lines until the issue was pointed out to me by Magical Chicken here. Aside from the few test images I look at the 24 Envy only serves as a console gaming and YouTube monitor to me (replaced the 25er with it).

After noticing the vertical lines they can not be unseen, however I do not find them to be problematic for my uses (frequent console gaming), but this does not mean that others will notice or not notice the lines; results may vary.

PC Monitors also noticed the vertical black lines on the following monitors:

AOC I481FXH PC Monitors Review
Viewsonic VP2468 PC Monitors

Flaws in all, the HP 24 Envy is still an excellent monitor with very accurate color presets capable of providing an appropriately vibrant and natural presentation of content. It's not neutral and not perfect, but very, very few monitors are, and the 24 Envy's Almost Glossy/Low Haze coating further enhances clarity and color vibrancy since it is free from clarity and vibrancy reducing matte coating grain and sparkle. Aside from the black vertical line issue I think the 24 Envy's reduced color accuracy compared to the 25er/es is worth putting up with in order to gain access to its native 75hz refresh rate and AMD Free-Sync for PC gaming. Console gamers and those who do not game should buy the 25er/es instead since it's both more accurate and cheaper. The HP 25-27XW are also still worth considering since they're only slightly less accurate than the 25er/es, can overclock to 75hz and are cheaper than the HP 24 Envy.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 03:45:08 pm by NCX »

NCX

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Calibrated Image Quality

DSC_0452 by Dr NCX, on Flickr

HP 24 Envy Calibration Chart
by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr


The Blue setting needed to be greatly reduced from 255 to 219, but this left the monitor with an obvious green tint to white and some shades of grey. Reducing the Green setting from 255 to 247 and Red from 255 to 254 fixed the green dominance and left the HP looking very natural and neutral, and of course, accurate.

The HP 24 Envy is capable of covering 99% of the sRGB color space after calibration which is an excellent result for a budget monitor, and a superior result to the 25-27 HP CW/er/es/XW monitors which peaked at 94-98%. The 24 Envy's very accurate colors combined with the clarity and vibrancy reducing Low Haze coating provide a beautiful, but still flawed picture due to the thin black vertical lines visible on some light blue and orange shades.

The HP 24 Envy also looks a bit washed out when used with bright lighting due to its "frame-less" black bezel which the monitors high (versus OLED & Plasma) black level or low contrast (1,000:1) can not compete with. When the lights are off the HP looks even worse along with 99% of LCD panels which display black is greyish due to their low contrast, especially if their brightness is kept high in a light-less room.

When used with bias lighting (light placed behind the display) the HP 24 Envy looks beautiful since it, along with the majority of displays look much better when no light is penetrates the coating. Black blends with the glossy black frame-less bezel when used with my 4000 lumen 5000k LED light (example) and 5000 lumen 6500k CFL light (example) when the monitor's brightness is lowered to output 140cdm/2. Both of these lights cost 50$ Canadian, but they are essentially a one time investment which vastly improves the display viewing experience when used as a bias light since bias lighting eliminates reflections and vastly increases the perceived black depth of displays. Cheaper and dimmer bias lights can be used, but display brightness must be lowered to be used with dimmer lights. I use 140cdm/2 display brightness since it works well with a bright bias light and 2500 lumen ceiling light while <90cdm/2 display brightness functions well with 1500 lumen bias and ceiling lights.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2019, 01:18:00 am by NCX »

NCX

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Perceived Black Depth

HP 24 Envy TO1 NT vs T by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The Order 1886 Furnace Monitor Comparison Gallery

All of the HP monitors have fake border-less or frame-less casings with inner black bezels which ruin the perceived black depth since the darkest black the monitors are capable of displaying is much brighter than that of the casings.  Grey and silver casings help improve the perceived black depth, as well as don't look nearly as out of place as white casings do with most computer and display accessories such as desks, keyboards, mice and receivers. 

The 24 Envy has a four sided black bezel and semi-glossy coating which puts it in last place in terms of perceived black depth and it also has the lowest measured contrast ratio of 1000:1 versus 1000-1200:1 after calibration for the other HP monitors.  Proper display height paired with less than 100 nit or cdm/2 display brightness with a 2500 lumen bias light and no other light sources results in bezel blending perceived black depth from all the monitors, and no glare or reflections either.  I have multiple articles and videos about bias lighting, display brightness and proper display height.  The top of AHVA/IPS/PLS panels needs to at least match up with the viewers eyes, and ideally line up with the top of the viewers head to eliminate off angle vertical glow. 

The semi-glossy coating used by the 24 Envy further reduces the perceived black depth under bright lighting.  I put non-stick silver tape (3$ CAD for a roll) over the bezel to trick my eyes, or increase the perceived black depth vastly, however I still highly recommend only using the 24 Envy with bias lighting, which is a light(s) placed behind a display.

« Last Edit: August 10, 2018, 01:26:39 am by NCX »

NCX

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Viewing Angles

DSC_0409 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The 24 Envy suffers from the least amount of off axis vertical glow, and has the widest or most forgiving horizontal and vertical viewing angles out of the 24-27" 1080p HP monitors I tested.  The CW, er, es and XW monitors are all pretty much the same viewing angle and glow wise.  32" 4K AHVA panels are the best in terms of minimal off axis glow and wide viewing angles, but all AHVA/IPS/PLS panels look awful when viewed from above or looked down at like one must do with a TN panel.  AHVA/IPS/PLS panels only have wide viewing angles if the top of the display lines up with the top of the viewers head, and are not looked down at or from above.  When set at the correct height all of the HP monitors offer forgiving viewing angles which allow one to lean back or off to the side without seing obvious contrast and color vibrancy loss, and are of course vastly superior to any TN panel when placed at the right height.

« Last Edit: August 09, 2018, 11:11:11 pm by NCX »

NCX

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The 24 Envy suffers from the least amount of off axis vertical glow out of the 1080p IPS/PLS panels I've tested, and has the widest or most forgiving horizontal and vertical viewing angles.  The CW, er, es and XW monitors are all pretty much the same viewing angle and glow wise.  32" 4K AHVA panels are the best in terms of minimal off axis glow and wide viewing angles, but all AHVA/IPS/PLS panels look awful when viewed from above or looked down at like one must do with a TN panel.  AHVA/IPS/PLS panels only have wide viewing angles if the top of the display lines up with the top of the viewers head, and are not looked down at or from above.  When set at the correct height all of the HP monitors offer forgiving viewing angles which allow one to lean back or off to the side without seing obvious contrast and color vibrancy loss, and are of course vastly superior to any TN panel when placed at the right height.


« Last Edit: February 20, 2019, 12:44:07 am by NCX »

NCX

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Playstation 3 & 4

DSC_0394 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The HP monitors scale 1280x720 and 1920x1080 without issue, and unlike the HP CW/XW monitors the er/es and 24 Envy monitors do not lack an HDMI Black Level setting and automatically and correctly, so the Playstation 4's RGB Range setting does not need to be changed.

PS3:
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PS4 & PS4 Pro:
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« Last Edit: February 25, 2019, 02:31:11 am by NCX »