Author Topic: Samsung UN43NU7100FXZC & Sony 43X750F Review x2: Semi-Glossy 4K VA & IPS  (Read 214 times)

NCX

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Samsung 55NU7100 Review by Rtings
Sony 55X750F Review by Rtings
Best TV Review Sites; TV Review Resource Center

The best monitor reviewers are significantly superior to the best TV reviews, and the best monitors without HDR are vastly superior to most TV's available under 1000$ since TV's tend to be very inaccurate compared to monitors, and use LED PWM Dimming or flickering back-lights which ruin motion clarity and make some people suffer from health issues like headaches and/or eyestrain.

I do not make buying guides for TV's, but I do read TV reviews as well as have tested and/or owned a few mid range and high end models such as the , Panasonic 42PZ80, Pioneer Kuro, Samsung LN46A950 (my first TV; purchased in 2009), Samsung PN51F8500 (father's TV) and Sony 49X900E (current TV).

The Sony 43X750F is one of very few LCD panel using televisions made in the past few years which has both accurate color presets and PWM free back-lighting, however it has a 27ms delay (Game & Graphics mode) which is around 12ms higher than the fastest TV's, and 24ms slower than most monitors which can be considered delay free.

Review Information and Methodology:
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« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 09:41:14 pm by NCX »

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NCX

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Statues Not Included
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2018, 02:57:35 am »
Samsung Features & Stand

DSC_0210 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr


The 43NU7100 has a high quality and non-flimsy dark matte grey casing, a sturdy silver metallic stand (two feet which must be manually attached), 3x HDMI 2.0 ports with full 3840x2160 @ 60hz + YCbCr 4:4:4 support.  The Samsung also has an Ethernet port, 3x USB and 2x 10w speakers.  Samsung claims the 43NU7100 supports HDR, but there's no option to manually enabled it and neither my PC or PS4 Pro detected it has HDR capable, and it does not use a wide gamut panel  with high brightness required for HDR.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 08:41:01 pm by NCX »

NCX

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« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2018, 02:58:17 am »
Sony Features & Stand

DSC_0074 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Official Features & Specifications Page

The 43X750F has a high quality and non-flimsy dark matte grey casing, a sturdy silver metallic stand (two legs), 4x HDCP 2.3 HDMI ports with 3840x2160 @ 60hz + YCbCr 4:2:2 support.  The Sony also has component video, an Ethernet port, 3x USB and 2x 10w speakers.  Sony claims the 43X750F supports HDR, but there's no option to manually enabled it and neither my PC or PS4 Pro detected it has HDR capable, and it does not use a wide gamut panel  with high brightness required for HDR.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 08:30:36 pm by NCX »

NCX

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« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2018, 03:04:11 am »
Samsung Menu & Set-Up

DSC_0228 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Only the most important menu photos will be posted here.

Unlike the Sony which costs significantly more, the Samsung can not automatically detect the source and decide which Picture mode to switch to, nor can it be easily set to the Game mode which vastly reduces the input lag to a nearly negligible amount of 8ms versus the lowest 2-3ms top screen Leo Bodnar device measurements: 

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The Game Mode must be manually enabled in the External Device Manager menu, as does full resolution 3840x2160 and YCbCr 4:4:4 chroma sub-sampling support which must be turned on in the HDMI UHD Color sub-menu.  Once this is activated the RGB Full and YCbCr 4:4:4 option show up in the Nvidia control panel while only YCbCr 2:2:2 was available before activating UHD Color.  The maximum brightness and color accuracy vastly improved once the HDMI UHD Color setting was enabled, for measurements and more information refer to the Samsung Preset Color Accuracy section of the review.

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Once the input lag reduced Game Mode setting is activated in the External Device Manager menu, travel back up to the Picture Menu.  When connected to my PS4 Pro and Xbox One S the Picture Mode menu was not greyed out, but was when connected to my PC.  This isn't an issue since the other modes are useless aside from the Standard mode which allows one to use the mediocre motion compensation feature.

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Click on Expert Settings to access the back-light controls and color adjustments.  The settings shown below are my calibrated settings:

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Scroll down to access even more settings including the extremely importent Warm2 Color Tone setting which is preset to Cool which causes the Samsung to suffer from a strong blue tint.  Once Warm2 is selected the color accuracy increases significantly.  The BT.1886 setting either decreases (-) or increases (+) the gamma.

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The White Balance menu contains the RGB Gain and Offset settings while the 20 Point setting contains even more, but are not accessible when the Game Mode is selected. 

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Here are my calibrated RGB Gain and Off-Set settings which I don't advise using since the Samsung is accurate enough once the Warm2 Color Tone setting is selecting.

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« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 03:21:52 am by NCX »

NCX

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Adaptable Like A Hardlight
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2018, 03:05:27 am »
Sony Menu & Set-Up

DSC_0130 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Only the most important menu photos will be posted here; click on the Sony 43X750F Menu Album linked to see photos of every 43X750F menu.

The Auto picture mode setting was preset to On, which automatically set the Sony to the Graphics mode when I connected it to my PC.  The Custom, Game (reduced lag) and Graphics (reduced lag) Picture modes (color presets) are the most accurate, nearly identical, and allow access to the all of the important settings.  Aside from turning off the Auto picture mode and using the Game or Graphics mode and turning off the Adv. contrast enhancer shown below, there's no need to change any other settings.

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The Adv. contrast enhancer is turned on by default and causes detail loss, so it's best to turn it off. 

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The Color menu contains the Adv. color temperature sub-menu which when selected leads to the color controls which includes, Red, Gren and Blue Gain, Off-Set and 10 Point Gamma controls.

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RGB Gain settings in the Adv. color temperature sub-menu:

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RGB Bias and 10 point Color gamma adjustment point settings:

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Here are my Gain and Off-Set settings:

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« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 03:22:20 am by NCX »

NCX

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Re: Sony 43X750F Review: Semi-Glossy 4K IPS TV
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2018, 03:28:30 am »
Samsung Flicker/PWM Dimming

Samsung 43NU7100 50 Back Light vs  30 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The Samsung uses low frequency LED PWM Dimming (read about the side effects), when the back-light is set to 49/50 or lower.  LED PWM Dimming is tested for using the Blur Busters Test UFO Blur Trail/PWM Test from 0-100% Brightness, and used this testing method developed by TFT Central.  The two pictures above are of the 50/50 back-light photo and 30/50.

PWM or Flicker ruins motion clarity (example), and can cause some people to suffer from health issues such as headaches, and/or eyestrain.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 08:57:32 pm by NCX »

NCX

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« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2018, 03:14:21 am »
Sony Flicker/PWM Dimming

DSC_0128 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The Sony 43X750F does not use LED PWM Dimming (read about the side effects), regardless of high or low the brightness is set.  LED PWM Dimming is tested for using the Blur Busters Test UFO Blur Trail/PWM Test from 0-100% Brightness.  The lack of PWM is good since PWM or Flicker ruins motion clarity (example), and can cause some people to suffer from health issues such as headaches, and/or eyestrain.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 03:23:31 am by NCX »

NCX

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« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2018, 03:14:42 am »
Samsung Brightness & Contrast

Samsung 43NU7100 B & C by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The 43NU7100's brightness ranges from 13.06-306.61cdm/2, and the contrast averages around 4080:1 which is significantly above average for a VA panel which usually have around 3,000:1 contrast.  The Samsung is barely acceptable for bright room use, and outstanding for dark room use since it can get very dim, and has very high contrast if accounting for VA panels used in monitors and TV's.

Neither the Samsung nor Sony are suitable for brightly lit rooms since they use very reflective semi-glossy coatings and can't get bright enough, but the Samsung is more suitable for dark and light-less rooms since it can get more than six times as dim, and has vastly higher contrast.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 10:00:36 pm by NCX »

NCX

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« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2018, 03:15:00 am »
Sony Brightness & Contrast

DSC_0053 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Sony 43X750F B & C by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The 43X750F's brightness ranges from 83.65-272.23cdm/2, and the contrast averages around 935:1 which is barely above average.  The Sony is too dim for bright room use, and barely acceptable for light-less room use since it can only dim down to 84cdm/2.  These results are disappointing when considering the fact that the 43X750F is one of the most expensive and highest end 43" TV's around, especially since IPS/PLS are capable of outputting 350cdm/2 with 1300:1 contrast.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 03:24:03 am by NCX »

NCX

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Re: Sony 43X750F Review: Semi-Glossy 4K IPS TV
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2018, 03:15:21 am »
Samsung Semi-Glossy Coating

Samsung 43UN7100 30/50BL The Order 1886 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Almost all televisions use a form of semi-glossy coating, which is the worst type of non-matte coating since semi-glossy coatings make black looked greyish, and displays look washed out under bright lighting.  Some semi-glossy coatings are worse than others, and the 43NU7100's coating is one of the least desirable types of semi-glossy coatings, especially since the panel is not very bright, though it is slightly brighter than the Sony.  The first photo is of the 43NU7100 with my ceiling light turned on, and with 140cdm/2 display brightness.  Here it is with the ceiling light on and maximum brightness of 306cdm/2:


Photo of the Samsung with my bias lights (3x LIFX BR30's set to 4000k and maximum brightness) and 140cdm/2 display brightness (30/50 Back-light setting) versus the ceiling light:

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Bias lighting (lights placed behind a display) is highly recommended since the 43NU7100 is not very bright, and because its semi-glossy coating makes it look washed out under bright lighting.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 04:48:11 am by NCX »

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Re: Sony 43X750F Review: Semi-Glossy 4K IPS TV
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2018, 03:15:51 am »
Sony Semi-Glossy Coating

DSC_0031 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Almost all televisions use a form of semi-glossy coating, which is the worst type of non-matte coating since semi-glossy coatings make black looked greyish, and displays look washed out under bright lighting.  Some semi-glossy coatings are worse than others, and the 43X750F's coating is one of the least desirable types of semi-glossy coatings, especially since this panel is not very bright.  The first photo is of the 43X750F with my ceiling light turned on, and with 140cdm/2 display brightness.  Here it is with the ceiling light on and maximum brightness of 272cdm/2:

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Photo of the Sony with my bias lights (3x LIFX BR30's set to 4000k and maximum brightness) and 140cdm/2 display brightness (17/50 menu brightness) versus the ceiling light:


Bias lighting (lights placed behind a display) is highly recommended since the 43X750F is not very bright, and because its semi-glossy coating makes it look washed out under bright lighting.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 04:48:31 am by NCX »

NCX

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Pixel Response Time Speed: Elephant
« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2018, 03:16:12 am »
Samsung Ghosting/Overdrive

DSC_0230 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The following are non-pursuit photo compilations of the Test UFO Ghosting test with each monitors back-light or brightness setting set to the maximum.  The AOC and Sony are completely PWM/Flicker Free while the Samsung uses low frequency PWM when the back-light setting is set to 49/50 and lower.  LED PWM Dimming or flicker reduces motion clarity and makes content in smooth camera pans appear to judder and blur significantly more than PWM/Flicker free displays like the AOC and Sony.

Cyan Pixel Response Comparison
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In this comparison the Sony is the fastest except in the top UFO which shows a bit more ghosting than the AOC, which along with the Sony has vastly faster pixel response times than the Samsung which along with the others is overshoot ghosting free, but has very slow pixel response times resulting in very obvious color streaking and smearing of black, brown and grey shades, even when watching media.  I witnessed some obvious smearing when watching The Bodygaurd and Frankenstein Chronicles on Netflix, both of which are shows with many black, brown and grey colors and shades since both contain many scenes with people in dark suits, and brown oak furniture.  Even when the back-light is set to maximum to prevent PWM blur, the Samsung offers very poor overdrive performance since it has very slow pixel response times, especially compared to VA panels in 32" 4K VA panels like the BenQ EW3270 (review links) and similarly priced LG 32UD59 (review links), which are both PWM/Flicker Free.  Rtings tested both the LG 32UD59 and the 55" version of the NU7100, here are the pursuit camera photographs of their own custom ghosting test which is based on, and uses the photographic methodology created by Blur Busters.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 04:51:24 am by NCX »

NCX

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« Reply #13 on: October 28, 2018, 03:16:26 am »
Sony Ghosting/Overdrive

DSC_0073 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The following are non-pursuit photo compilations of the Test UFO Ghosting test with each monitors back-light or brightness setting set to the maximum.  The AOC and Sony are completely PWM/Flicker Free while the Samsung uses low frequency PWM when the back-light setting is set to 49/50 and lower.  LED PWM Dimming or flicker reduces motion clarity and makes content in smooth camera pans appear to judder and blur significantly more than PWM/Flicker free displays like the AOC and Sony.

Cyan Pixel Response Comparison
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In this comparison the Sony is the fastest except in the top UFO which shows a bit more ghosting than the AOC, which along with the Sony has vastly faster pixel response times than the Samsung which along with the others is overshoot ghosting free, but has very slow pixel response times resulting in very obvious color streaking and smearing of black, brown and grey shades.  Even when the back-light is set to maximum to prevent PWM blur, the Samsung offers very poor overdrive performance since it has very slow pixel response times, especially compared to VA panels in similarly priced 32" 4K VA panels like the BenQ EW3270 which is PWM/Flicker Free.

The Sony 43X750F offers both overshoot ghosting and PWM blur free overdrive, and fast pixel response times competitive with the fastest 60hz AHVA/IPS/PLS panels like the Acer XB321HK I tested in 2017, AOC AG271QG, and unlike almost all TV competitors, the Sony is free from PWM blur.  The Sony still suffers from a bit of color streaking, but only slightly more so than the fastest 60hz TN panels like the BenQ Zowie RL2460.

Cyan Pixel Response Comparison
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« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 10:35:22 pm by NCX »

NCX

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« Reply #14 on: October 28, 2018, 03:16:47 am »
Samsung Input Lag

DSC_0213 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

When the Game mode and UHD Color settings are enabled the Samsung 43NU7100 has an 8ms (top screen Leo Bodnar measurement @1080p) delay.  It's possible but unlikely that the Samsung has lower input lag at 4K since the 1080p delay is already extremely low, especially compared to most TV competitors which get as low as have 11-15ms delays when their Game or PC modes are enabled.  The fastest monitors have 2-4ms delays, or are two to four times faster, however, the Samsung still impresses since it has slightly more than three times less input lag than the Sony which has a 27ms delay.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 04:53:10 am by NCX »