Author Topic: Samsung 43NU7100 & Sony 43X750F Review x2: Semi-Glossy 4K VA & IPS  (Read 759 times)

NCX

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Semi-Agile Window Smasher
« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2018, 03:17:03 am »
Sony Input Lag

DSC_0146 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

When the Game and Graphics modes are enabled the Sony 43X750F has a 27ms (top screen Leo Bodnar measurement @1080p) delay.  It's possible that the Sony has lower input lag at 4K, but highly unlikely.  The fastest TV's have 11-15ms delays when their Game or PC modes are enabled, but very, very few aside from OLED are PWM/Flicker Free like the Sony 43X750F.  The Sony 43X720E Rtings tested is a bit faster with a 20ms delay, but it has less accurate color presets, as does the X750F's predecessor which has higher input lag with 34ms.  Most monitors have <4ms delays.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 04:54:52 am by NCX »

NCX

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In Need Of Repair
« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2018, 03:17:18 am »
Samsung Preset Color Accuracy

DSC_0224 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Samsung 43NU7100 Preset Chart by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

As mentioned in the Samsung Menu & Set-Up section of the review, the Samsung looks awful unless the UHD Color setting is enabled since doing so enabled YCbCr 4:4:4 support, and corrects the unexplainably weird and skewed preset gamma.  Once the UHD Color setting is enabled the gamma changes from very strange black crush inducing reversed S curve to a fairly linear line trying, but falling slightly short of the linear 2.2 target.  Enabling UHD Color vastly improves the image quality, but the Samsung still suffers from a very strong blue tint since the Color Tone setting is preset to Cool.  Also, when connected to my PC the maximum brightness was greatly limited until I enabled the Game mode which is also located in the sub menu in the the External Settings menu.  Without both the Game and UHD Color settings enabled, the maximum brightness was limited to an extremely dim 90cdm/2 when the Warm 2 Color Tone setting was enabled. 

The Samsung becomes very accurate once the Game Mode, UHD Color and Warm 2 color setting are enabled.  The gamma is slightly too low, and a slight blue tint is still present, but these flaws are minor and to be expected from an affordable TV.  The 43NU7100 offers excellent image quality for an affordable VA panel once the UHD Color, Game Mode (when connected to a PC) and Warm 2 color settings are selected.

Samsung HCFR Grey Scale
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Samsung HCFR Gamma
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Samsung RGB Levels
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Samsung HCFR CIE Diagram
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« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 04:59:56 am by NCX »

NCX

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A Nearly Grasped Donut
« Reply #17 on: October 28, 2018, 03:17:54 am »
Sony Preset Color Accuracy

DSC_0076 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Sony 43X750F Preset Chart by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The Sony automatically detects the type of source (cable box, console or PC for example) and automatically switches to the correct mode (Game or Graphics) with lower input lag, when connecting to a console or PC.  Unfortunately it only supports YCbCr 4:2:0, and not the full 4:4:4, which is required for blur and color blending free color and text.  Fortunately the Sony is nearly perfect in terms of preset color accuracy overall, and in its price bracket or price tier.  The Sony has nearly perfectly linear 2.2 gamma for the HDTV/REC 709 standard, and only very minor blue under-saturation and red over-saturation which do not prevent the Sony from displaying greys and whites neutrally, or without an obvious preset dominance.  The Sony's main flaw is its miss-matched color gamut which can not fully cover the sRGB and HDTV/REC 709 color spaces since it slightly under and over-saturates some colors.  The color space coverage offered by the Sony is on par with a budget (<200$) IPS/PLS panel, and should be perfect, however, the differences between the Sony and a display which lacks these flaws is nearly negligible.  Also, unlike the Samsung 43NU7100, no Sony settings need to be changed to ensure the best preset color accuracy or image quality.

Sony HCFR Grey Scale
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Sony HCFR Gamma
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Sony RGB Levels
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Sony HCFR CIE Diagram
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« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 05:02:21 am by NCX »

NCX

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What?
« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2018, 12:17:41 am »
Samsung Un-Calibrated vs Calibrated Comparisons

These comparisons are of the Samsung's Game mode with UHD Color on, and the Default Cool 2 color temperature setting versus the monitor when calibrated in the Game Mode.  The Samsung suffers from a very strong blue tint by default when both the Game Mode and UHD Color settings are turned on and off, and the blue over-saturation is strong enough to nearly hide the presence of green in some content.  The preset gamma is also marginally too low out-of-the-box, but can be improved by setting the BT 1886 setting to -1.

Samsung 43UN7100 Un-Calibrated 1 
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Samsung 43UN7100 Calibrated 1 
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Samsung 43UN7100 Un-Calibrated 2 
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Samsung 43UN7100 Calibrated 2 
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Samsung 43UN7100 Un-Calibrated 3 
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Samsung 43UN7100 Calibrated 3 
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Samsung 43UN7100 Un-Calibrated 4 
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Samsung 43UN7100 Calibrated 4 
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« Last Edit: January 03, 2019, 02:32:13 am by NCX »

NCX

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A Bargain Free Shop
« Reply #19 on: November 14, 2018, 12:18:05 am »
Sony Un-Calibrated vs Calibrated Comparisons

There's only slight measure-able and perceive-able difference between the Sony out-of-the-box and after calibration.

Sony 43X750F Un-Calibrated 1 
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Sony 43X750F Calibrated 1
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Sony 43X750F Un-Calibrated 2
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Sony 43X750F Calibrated 2
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Sony 43X750F Un-Calibrated 3
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Sony 43X750F Calibrated 3
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« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 05:13:34 am by NCX »

NCX

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Similarly Flawed & Great
« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2018, 06:43:47 pm »
Calibrated Image Quality

Samsung 43UN7100 vs Sony 43X750F CC by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The sRGB color space coverage measurements come from dispcalgui's software calibration ICC profile verification which slightly decreased the Sony's accuracy versus my menu calibrations, so I did not use dispcalgui to calibrate the Samsung, especially since the process takes around two hours.  Instead I included the HCFR HDTV/REC 709 CIE Diagram which shows the displays coverage of the the HDTV/REC 709 color space, which is very similar to the sRGB color space:

Color Gamut Coverage Comparison
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Neither display can fully cover the HDTV/REC 709 or sRGB color space, and both suffer from over-saturation, however, the Sony's flaws are more severe since it is one of the most expensive 43" 4K display on the market.  The Sony is more accurate and vibrant since it doesn't dim during dark scenes, and has more accurate and linear gamma than the Samsung which uses a VA panel with horizontal gamma shift and black crush.  The Samsung has less accurate, vibrant and even color and shades, but it also has four times lower contrast or higher black depth, and significantly more glow when displaying black which ruined dark content viewing.  As shown below, the displays look very similar after calibration when comparing photos not meant to highlight VA gamma shift and black depth/contrast differences:

Samsung 43NU7100: Family Photo
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Sony 43X750F: Family Photo
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Samsung 43NU7100: Ascendant Realm
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Sony 43X750F: Ascendant Realm
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AHVA/IPS/PLS VS VA Gamma Shift:

AOC AG271QG (AHVA) Gamma Shift
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Samsung 43NU7100 (A-MVA) Gamma Shift
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Notice how much darker the center of the VA panel is compared to the AHVA panel, and how much lighter the sides are. VA panels appear to have a dark iris in the center, which fades when viewed off angle horizontally, which also can result in detail which was obscured from viewed from head on becoming visible.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2019, 02:16:32 am by NCX »

NCX

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Looking For Improvements
« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2018, 06:44:00 pm »
Samsung Settings

DSC_0225 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Check the Menu & Set-Up section of the review to see photos of the menu with these settings if unsure of where to find them.

Backlight: 30
Contrast: 47
Color Tone: Warm 2
BT 1886: -1
2 Point White Balance:
R-Gain: 5
G-Gain: -2
B-Gain -6
R-Offset -3
G-Offset: -2
B-Offset: -3

« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 05:15:37 am by NCX »

NCX

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Nothing To Fix
« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2018, 06:44:09 pm »
Sony Settings

DSC_0129 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Check the Menu & Set-Up section of the review to see photos of the menu with these settings if unsure of where to find them.

Back-light: 17

Red Gain: -5
Green Gain: -3
Blue Gain: -5
Red Bias: -1
Green Bias: -2
Blue Bias: -3
« Last Edit: January 03, 2019, 02:34:22 am by NCX »

NCX

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Darker Darkness
« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2018, 06:44:18 pm »
Samsung Perceived Black Depth

Samsung 43UN7100 D2 Pyramid by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The perceived black depth offered by the Samsung is vastly superior to the Sony since the Samsung has a 4000:1 contrast ratio, lighter matte grey bezel, and my unit did not suffer from obvious back-light bleed or glow.  However, the Samsung automatically lowers the brightness in dark scenes, which is very noticeable when switching quickly between bright and dark content such as the game screen shots I use of The Order 1886.  The fast brightness change can't be disabled, and the lower brightness reduces the ability to see all the details of some dark content.  The auto-lowering brightness and VA panel black crush reduces the ability to see details in dark scenes slightly, but the automatic dimming was only noticeable when switching between photos or screen shots of dark content, and not when viewing non-static content such as a game, movie, or TV show.

Here's the same Destiny 2 Pyramid ship screen on shot on the Samsung, but this time with the lights off while the top photo is with my bias lights on:

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Destiny Trials Of Osiris armor:
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« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 05:19:40 am by NCX »

NCX

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Brighter Darkness
« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2018, 06:44:27 pm »
Sony Perceived Black Depth

DSC_0122 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The Sony has poor perceived black depth due to its glossy coating, inner black bezel, and back-light and glow in the top corners which only became invisible from a 5.5ft viewing distance which is ridiculous for a 43" display (3-4ft expected glow free distance for a 43" IPS).  The perceived black depth is poor even when bias lighting (lights placed behind the display) is used, which was surprising since the panel in the Crossover 434K with 600:1 contrast which I reviewed in 2015 had a better semi-glossy coating, and was glow free when viewed from 3ft away.  Here's the Destiny 2 Pyramid ship screen on shot on the Sony, but this time with the lights off while the top photo is with my bias lights on:

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Destiny Trials Of Osiris armor:
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« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 05:22:18 am by NCX »

NCX

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Seeing Darkness
« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2018, 06:44:36 pm »
Back-Light Bleed

The Order 1886 Statue Reference by Dr NCX, on Flickr

My Qnix UHD32R (almost-glossy or low haze coated 32" 4K AUO AHVA panel) has a 800:1 contrast ratio after calibration and far more back-light bleed than the Sony, which is very obvious when the lights are off.  My The Order 1886 Lights Off 15s album contains photos of many displays ranging from 130-1200$ US MSRP.

Qnix UHD32R with 808:1 contrast after calibration:
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Qnix UHD3216R with 1200:1 contrast after calibration:
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Samsung F2380MX with 3,300:1 contrast after calibration:
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The Samsung F2380MX uses a C-PVA panel, which is the first type of CCFL back-lit VA panel to achieve more than 3,000:1 contrast without local dimming, but have the slowest pixel response times.

Samsung 43UN7100 with 3,700:1 contrast after calibration:
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Keep in mind that the 43UN7100 reduces the brightness automatically in dark scenes, or has a built in dynamic contrast feature which can't be disabled.

Sony 43X750F with 886:1 contrast after calibration:
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When the lights are off both the Samsung and Sony clearly have higher contrast or lower black depth and far less back-light bleed than the Qnix.  However, when both my bias and ceiling lights are on the Qnix UHD3216R is the best thanks to the 1200:1 contrast and lack of  gamma shift and obvious back-light bleed.  The Qnix UHD32R is the second best since it has a perceived black depth increasing silver bezel, and a superior glossy coating variant which is less reflective and looks less washed out under bright lighting.  The Samsung VA panels horizontal gamma shift causes the sides of the panel to be washed out and blue-ish, and can't show as much detail as the Qnix AHVA and Sony IPS panels.

« Last Edit: February 28, 2019, 03:22:51 am by NCX »

NCX

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Samsung VA Glow

Samsung 43NU7100 TO 1886 BL by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

VA panels suffer from more off-angle color-contrast loss than AHVA/IPS/PLS, which is quite obvious in the below photo since the dark greys, browns and blacks from the above photo look blue-ish, light and washed out off angle.  This color-shift or off angle loss is also quite obvious when sitting too close to VA panels, and when looking at VA panels slightly off-center horizontally.  I put the Samsung on shoe boxes to raise it, and sat around 3.5-4ft away to achieve the viewing angle sweet spot.

Samsung 43NU7100 Off Angle Glow
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« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 05:24:40 am by NCX »

NCX

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Sony IPS Glow

DSC_0036 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

Sony 43X750F: The Order 1886 Furnace Lights Off
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The Sony suffers from obvious glow in both top corners which only became non-obvious when I sat 5.5ft away.  Also, because of the inner black bezel and coating, black always looked a bit greyish in dark scenes, even though the Sony has >200:1 higher contrast than the last 43" IPS I tested the Crossover 434K, and my Qnix UHD32R which uses an AHVA panel, which is AUO's version of IPS, and only has a 700:1 contrast, but has a silver bezel and silver tape under the bezel which I put on to hide its inner black bezel.  I did not take any off-angle photos of the Sony since the top corners of the panel suffered from such obvious glow even when sitting directly in front of the Sony.  Refer to the Sony Perceived Black Depth section of the review for photos of the glow.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 07:56:43 pm by NCX »

NCX

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Samsung Viewing Angles

DSC_0381 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

VA panels have significantly worse off axis viewing angles than AHVA/IPS/PLS except when viewing dark content from above, though they're only slightly better.  The vertical viewing angles of AHVA/IPS/PLS are very poor when viewed from above or while looking down at them since they suffer from obvious contrast loss or glow (black looks grey-ish or white), and the same is true of VA panels, but their top-down viewing angles are more forgiving, and because they have higher contrast (>2,000:1 usually), white glow is less obvious.  I had to put the Samsung on shoe boxes to avoid seeing obvious glow and contrast loss in the bottom part of the panel, especially when viewing full-screen content.  The Sony did not need to be raised, but always suffered from obvious glow in the top corners unless viewed from over 5ft away.  Once raised, the Samsung looked great for a VA panel when viewed from more than 3.5ft away as long as I sat in the center and did not lean slightly off angle.

Samsung 43UN7100: Off Angle View
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« Last Edit: January 03, 2019, 03:27:18 am by NCX »

NCX

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Sony Viewing Angles

DSC_0155 by Deepinthesky Teslastorm, on Flickr

The Sony uses an IPS panel with very wide viewing angles which allow multiple people to gather around, or view from different positions (at the ends) of a couch without suffering from obvious contrast or vibrancy loss.  The vertical viewing angles of AHVA/IPS/PLS are very poor when viewed from above or while looking down at them since they suffer from obvious contrast loss or glow (black looks grey-ish or white), and the same is true of VA panels, but their top-down viewing angles are more forgiving, and because they have higher contrast (>2,000:1 usually), white glow is less obvious.  I had to put the Samsung on shoe boxes to avoid seeing obvious glow and contrast loss in the bottom part of the panel, especially when viewing full-screen content.  The Sony did not need to be raised, but always suffered from obvious glow in the top corners unless viewed from over 5ft away.  Once raised, the Samsung looked great for a VA panel when viewed from more than 3.5ft away as long as I sat in the center and did not lean slightly off angle.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2019, 03:24:49 am by NCX »