Best Reviewed Flicker Free Monitor Buying Guides > Best Reviewed Flicker Free Monitor Buying Guides

Best 27-28" 4K 3840x2160 & 5K 5120x2880 AHVA/IPS/PLS Monitors

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NCX:
Last Update=August 3rd 2020

2020 Reviews Added Here

2018-2019 Reviews Added Here

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Always purchase from retailers with hassle free return and exchange policies.  Read retailers return and exchange policies before buying.
My recommendations are based off of testing more than 60 monitors and reading in-depth reviews from over fifteen reviewers across the realm.

Many monitors not found in this thread likely perform well, but it makes more sense to buy well reviewed monitors, and I like having sources to refer to, even though I do not always agree with them.

If a monitor is not mentioned it is because it has not been reviewed properly, been reviewed at all or is mediocre.  All monitors suffer from regular quality control issues: back-light bleeding and pixel issues (dead and stuck pixels).

Recommendations are PWM or Flicker Free:
I do not recommend monitors which use low LED PWM Dimming frequencies since they ruin motion clarity and cause some people to suffer from health issues like head aches and eyestrain.  LED PWM Dimming Side Effects.

NCX:
Table Of Content

Best Monitors
Best AMD Free-Sync Monitors
Best Nvidia G-Sync Monitors
Nvidia Support for Adaptive or AMD Free-Sync
Correct Display Height=Reduced AHVA/IPS/PLS Glow
Improve Perceived Contrast/Black Depth & Reduce Glare With Bias Lighting
Acer
AOC
Asus
BenQ
Crossover
Dell
Eizo
HP
iiyama
Lenovo
LG
Monoprice
NEC
Philips
Samsung
Viewsonic
X-Star

NCX:
Best Monitors
*=Perceived black depth increasing matte black or grey (superior) bezel versus fake frame-less monitors perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel.
^=384 zone local dimming which vastly increases the contrast ratio.
+=Variable back-light which vastly increases the contrast ratio.
-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel
# Tested by NCX

1.) Acer ConceptD CP7271K *^ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
2.) Asus PG27UQ *^ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
2.) Acer X27 *^# (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
3.) Acer Predator XB273K *+ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 400cdm/2 HDR)
4. Acer Nitro XV273K * (120-144hz semi-wide gamut/HDR capable with AMD Free-Sync)
5.) Viewsonic VP2768-4K - (very accurate IPS panel with hardware calibration)
5.) Philips 272P7VPTKEB - (very accurate IPS)
6.) Asus PB27UQ * (accurate with 40-60hz Free-Sync)
7.) LG 27UL550 *# (accurate with 40-60hz Free-Sync)
8.) Monoprice RTD2795 -# (40-60hz Free-Sync & low glow AHVA panel)
8.) Viewsonic XG2700-4K * (40-60hz Free-Sync & very accurate IPS panel)
8.) BenQ PD2700U - (very accurate matte IPS with height adjustable stand)
9.) Philips 276E8VJSB - (very accurate matte IPS without VESA mounts)
10.) Dell P2715Q * (very accurate IPS panel & real bezel)
11.) LG 27UL650  - (40-60hz Free-Sync; 2019 model with slightly faster pixel response times than the UD and UK monitors)
11.) LG 27UD69 - (40-60hz Free-Sync)
11.) LG 27UD68 - (40-60hz Free-Sync)
11. LG 27UK650 - (40-60hz Free-Sync)
12.) LG 27UK600 - (40-60hz Free-Sync)
12.) BenQ EW2780U -

The Acer ConceptD CP7271K is a matte, height adjustable, 3840x2160 AUO AHVA panel with 384 zone local dimming, with 24-144hz Nvidia G-Sync, Displayport, HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0 and 3.5mm Auido Out.  The Acer ConceptD CP7271K has a native 1100:1 contrast ratio (FALD or local dimming disabled), 90.9% DCI-P3 (HDR) and 96.9% sRGB (when the SDR Color sRGB mode is enabled which prevents the over-saturation of non-HDR content) color space coverage, and very accurate color presets out of the box aside from a very minor blue tint and gamma dip at 10% grey.  The CP7271K has a low glow AHVA panel, especially when local dimming is enabled, and fast pixel response times; =DEAD= does not test for input lag, but Tom's Hardware did and measured a 31ms delay versus 36ms for the Asus PG27UQ and 39ms for the Acer X27.

The Acer X27 and Asus PG27UQ are matte 4K AHVA panels with 98hz (8 Bit +FRC / 10 bit HDR 4:4:4), Nvidia G-Sync, height adjustable stand, 4x USB 3.0, local dimming and true HDR color.  Full 4K and 10 bit color (YcBcr 4:4:4) is only supported up to 98hz.  Higher refresh rates requires one to drop the signal from 10 bit to 8 bit (120hz) and from  YcBcr 4:4:4 to YcBcr 4:2:2 (144hz), which results in a loss of clarity, color and text sharpness.  The 384 zone local dimming, gamma shift free and low glow AHVA panel these monitors use allow them to provide vastly superior image quality (especially dark content) compared to all other LCD panels.  Tthe Acer XB273K which is a lower end version with slightly lower HDR color space coverage, lower maximum brightness (400cdm/2 vs 1000cdm/2), and inferior variable back-lighting since the XB273K is edge lit while the X27 and PG27UQ have 384 dimming zones.  According to TechSpot the Acer has slightly better preset color accuracy and lower input lag than the Asus (11.4ms versus 15.6ms), but has slightly slower pixel response times.  Other reviews prove that the Asus is more accurate.

The Acer XB273K has very accurate accurate (SDR/sRGB & HDR color modes; color controls are locked when HDR is enabled) 144hz (achievable only when connected with 2x Displayport cables) 3840x2160 or 4K matte wide gamut AUO HAVA panel which can cover 87.65% of the DCI-P3 color space, provide 460cdmn/2 peak brightness, and can fully cover the sRGB color space to prevent over-saturation when the sRGB mode is selected.  It has a fully adjustable stand, a monitor hood, 1x Displayport, 1x HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0, 3.5mm Audio Out and Nvidia G-Sync.

My rankings prioritize preset color accuracy, low glow and perceived black depth increasing matte grey bezels.  Ranking the non-top 3 monitors is difficult since I have not tested most of them myself and can not determine how much glow they suffer from.  The Philips 276E8VJSB is the best cheap option since it is very accurate, as accurate as some of the 500$+ options and is the cheapest in most countries.  The 27UL550 I tested suffers from minimal glow, tends to be quite competitively priced and supports Free-Sync, but it's not as accurate as the Asus PB27UQ, BenQ PD2700U, Philips 272P7VPTKEB, Philips 276E8VJSB, Viewsonic VP2768-4K, and Viewsonic XG2700-4K.  The Viewsonic XG2700-4K has a perceived black depth increasing matte grey bezel, supports Free-Sync and has nearly perfect preset color accuracy, but uses an older LG AH-IPS panel with more glow than the Acer X27, XB273K, XV273K, Asus PG27UQ 27UL550 and Monoprice RTD2795; I'm not sure if it glows less than the other models I did not mention.

LG UD, UK and UL Series monitors Belgium Hardware Colorimeter and Oscilloscope Measurement Comparison Chart.

NCX:
Best AMD Free-Sync Monitors
*=Perceived black depth increasing matte black or grey (superior) bezel versus fake frame-less monitors perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel.
^=384 zone local dimming which vastly increases the contrast ratio.
+=Variable back-light which vastly increases the contrast ratio.
-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel
# Tested by NCX

1.) Acer Nitro XV273K * (120-144hz semi-wide gamut/HDR capable with AMD Free-Sync)
2.) Acer ConceptD CP3271K (120-144hz semi-wide gamut/HDR capable with AMD Free-Sync)
3.) Asus PB27UQ *
4.) LG 27UL550 *#
5.) Monoprice RTD2795 -#
5.) Viewsonic XG2700-4K *
6.) LG 27UL650 - (2019 model with slightly faster pixel response times than the UD and UK monitors)
6.) LG 27UK650 -
6.) LG 27UD68 or 69 -

The Acer XV273K has an accurate 144hz (achievable only when connected with 2x Displayport cables) 3840x2160 or 4K matte wide gamut AUO HAVA panel which can cover 97% of the DCI-P3 color space, and can fully cover the sRGB color space to prevent over-saturation when the sRGB mode is available.  It has a fully adjustable stand, a monitor hood, 2x Displayport, 2x HDMI 2.0,4x USB 3.0 and a 3.5mm Audio Out.  The  Acer XV273K offers superior HDR support and preset color accuracy versus the CP3271K, but are otherwise very similar.

The Acer ConceptD CP3271K is a fully adjust-able, matte, 120hz (144hz with 2x Displayport cables at 4K) 3840x2160, AHVA/IPS/PLS panel with AMD Free-Sync (xx-144hz range) with 2x Displayport 1.4 (2x DP required for 144hz), 2x HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0, and 3.5mm Audio Out.  The Acer is quite accurate, but does not really support HDR due to the lack of local dimming and the low 81% DCI-P3 color space coverage.  The default Normal overdrive setting provides very fast and overshoot free pixel response times at 60hz and 120hz, and at 120hz the higher Extreme overdrive setting provides negligible input lag and fast pixel response times but with a bit of overshoot.  The HDR (DCI-P3) mode is mediocre and best left off due to the low brightness and DCI-P3 color space coverage, and lack of local dimming.

Reading the monitors included manual and reviews is necessary in order to properly understand how to use a wide gamut monitor, fully make use of all its feature, and prevent wide gamut color over-saturation.

For multi-media (gaming, photo viewing, movies and TV) the Asus PB27UQ is the best affordable option since it has a perceived black depth increasing dark matte grey bezel, excellent all around performance and supports Adaptive/AMD Free-Sync.  The LG 27UL550 is the second best option with Free-Sync since it is more accurate than the Monoprice, suffers from less glow than the XG2700-4K, and has a perceived black depth increasing dark matte grey bezel while the LG UD and UK monitors use fake bezel or frame-less casings with perceived black depth decreasing inner black bezels.  The Monoprice RTD2795 is the third best affordable option since it uses a low glow AHVA panel, and because its preset color accuracy can be vastly improved and become competitive by changing the Temperature setting in the Color Menu to Warm.

The Viewsonic XG2700-4K has nearly perfect preset accuracy and a bright matte grey bezel which vastly increases the perceived black depth, but it uses an older IPS panel with more glow than Asus PB27UQ, LG 27UL550 and Monoprice RTD2795, and its Response Time and Input Lag settings are preset to the lowest settings or turned off and need to be changed to offer competitive pixel response times and input lag.  Set the Response Time Setting to Advanced in the Manual Image Adjust menu, then in the Manual Image Adjust Menu go to the Advanced Image Adjust sub-menu and set the Low Input Lag setting to the highest setting.  Menu Photo Tour from the Tom's Hardware Review.

LG UD, UK and UL Series monitors Belgium Hardware Colorimeter and Oscilloscope Measurement Comparison Chart.

The LG 27UD68 (2016) and 27UD69 (2017) are pretty much the same as the 27UK650 which is more accurate than the 27UK850-W (2018) which has a height adjustable stand, USB 3.0 (x2) faux HDR* support and supports hardware calibration (LG True Color Pro which requires a colorimeter) while the 68, 69, and 650 monitors do not support hardware calibration.  The 27UK850-W reviewed by Alexander Gryzhin (=DEAD=) came with lower preset gamma than the 68 & 69, but it can be raised by changing the Gamma Mode from 2 to 4.  The 27UK850-W's hardware calibration feature caused increased banding and tinting of gradients which makes it a feature not worth buying a colorimeter for since more accurate, and cheaper competitors are available.

*The LG monitors lack a true 10 bit wide gamut panel required for proper HDR support, as well as only offers 450cdm/2 brightness of the 1,000cdm/2 minimum of the HDR standard.  HDR is best left off.

NCX:
Best Nvidia G-Sync Monitors
Blur Busters G-Sync Input Lag Testing & Optimal Lag Reducing Game Settings

*=Perceived black depth increasing matte black or grey (superior) bezel versus fake frame-less monitors perceived black depth reducing inner black bezel.
^=384 zone local dimming which increases the contrast ratio.
+=Variable back-light which increases the contrast ratio.
-Perceived black depth decreasing fake bezel or frame-less casing with an inner black bezel
# Tested by NCX

1.) Acer ConceptD CP7271K *^ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
2.) Asus PG27UQ *^ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
2.) Acer X27 *^# (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 1000cdm/2 HDR)
3.) Acer Predator XB273K *+ (10 bit 98hz 4k, G-Sync, 400cdm/2 HDR)
4.) AOC AG271UG * (30-60hz G-Sync)
5.) Asus PG27AQ - (30-60hz G-Sync)
6.) Acer XB271HK - (30-60hz G-Sync)


The Acer ConceptD CP7271K is a matte, height adjustable, 3840x2160 AUO AHVA panel with 384 zone local dimming, with 24-144hz Nvidia G-Sync, Displayport, HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0 and 3.5mm Auido Out.  The Acer ConceptD CP7271K has a native 1100:1 contrast ratio (FALD or local dimming disabled), 90.9% DCI-P3 (HDR) and 96.9% sRGB (when the SDR Color sRGB mode is enabled which prevents the over-saturation of non-HDR content) color space coverage, and very accurate color presets out of the box aside from a very minor blue tint and gamma dip at 10% grey.  The CP7271K has a low glow AHVA panel, especially when local dimming is enabled, and fast pixel response times; =DEAD= does not test for input lag, but Tom's Hardware did and measured a 31ms delay versus 36ms for the Asus PG27UQ and 39ms for the Acer X27.

The Acer X27 and Asus PG27UQ are matte 4K AHVA panels with 98hz (8 Bit +FRC / 10 bit HDR 4:4:4), Nvidia G-Sync, height adjustable stand, 4x USB 3.0, local dimming and true HDR color.  Full 4K and 10 bit color (YcBcr 4:4:4) is only supported up to 98hz.  Higher refresh rates requires one to drop the signal from 10 bit to 8 bit (120hz) and from  YcBcr 4:4:4 to YcBcr 4:2:2 (144hz), which results in a loss of clarity, color and text sharpness.  The 384 zone local dimming, gamma shift free and low glow AHVA panel these monitors use allow them to provide vastly superior image quality (especially dark content) compared to all other LCD panels.  According to TechSpot the Acer has slightly better preset color accuracy and lower input lag than the Asus (11.4ms versus 15.6ms), but has slightly slower pixel response times.  Other reviews prove that the Asus is more accurate.

The Acer XB273K, X27 and Asus PG27UQ all have over a frame (17ms) of input lag at 60hz, and low (<5ms) delays at 144hz.  The delay is higher (around 10ms) at 98hz which provides 10 bit and 4:4:4 color support.

The Acer XB273K is a lower end version of the X27 and PG27UQ with slightly lower HDR color space coverage, lower maximum brightness (460cdm/2 vs 1000cdm/2), and inferior variable back-ligh dimming since the XB273K only has three dimming zones while the X27 and PG27UQ have 384 dimming zones. 

The Acer XB273K has very accurate Standard mode preset  (SDR/sRGB & HDR color modes; color controls are locked when HDR is enabled), 144hz (compressed 4:2:2 YCbCr422 color signal called instead of 8 bit 4:4:4 YCbCr444 @120hz and 10 bit 4:4:4 YCbCr444 @98hz), 3840x2160 or 4K matte wide gamut AUO HAVA panel which can cover 87.65% of the DCI-P3 color space, provide 460cdmn/2 peak brightness, and can fully cover the sRGB color space to prevent over-saturation when the sRGB mode is selected.  It has a fully adjustable stand, a monitor hood, 1x Displayport, 1x HDMI 2.0, 4x USB 3.0, 3.5mm Audio Out and Nvidia G-Sync.

The Asus ROG Strix XG27UQ is a significantly less accurate alternative to the Acer XB273K, and unlike the Acer, the Asus locks the sRGB modes brightness and color controls, and has slower pixel response times, but less input lag (2ms) versus the Acer (21ms) at 60hz.

Reading the monitors included manual and/or reviews of the Acer X27, XV273K and Asus PG27UQ is necessary in order to properly understand how to use a wide gamut monitor, and fully make use of all their features such as the 384 zone local dimming or dynamic contrast, and prevent wide gamut color over-saturation.

There are three 60hz 27" 4K monitors with Nvidia G-Sync, they are the Acer XB271HK (worst), AOC AG271UG and the Asus PG27AQ. All have fully adjustable stands, fast pixel response times with minimal overshoot ghosting and negligible input lag, but the AOC and Asus have superior preset color accuracy since the Acer XB271HK suffers from suffers from bleaching and an inaccurate preset gamma curve caused by the contrast being set too high (reducing contrast from 50 to 42 fixes this according to Toms Hardware).

The AOC is slightly less accurate than the Asus, but the AOC has gamma settings to fix the lowish preset gamma while the Asus does not which leaves one at the mercy of the factory calibration which is why both are tied for third place.

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